running pump


  #1  
Old 06-26-12, 08:55 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
running pump

ok to start my tank is full and my pump keeps going non stop water is flowing out what appears to be a overflow value pressure on gauge is high but water keeps flowing out is it a switch please help Benn
 
  #2  
Old 06-27-12, 04:44 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
Welcome to the forum
If you haven't, I would kill the power to the pump and get your pressure valve looked at.
How high is your pressure gauge reading?
 
  #3  
Old 06-27-12, 05:44 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,953
Received 2,225 Upvotes on 1,986 Posts
I have never seen a system with a pressure relief or overflow valve so I wonder if you have a leak or if your pressure got high enough to blow something out. Definitely turn off the power to the pump until you get it fixed. As Northern Mike mentioned I would start with the pressure switch. I would also inspect the pipe nipple leading to the switch as they can corrode closed or get blocked with sediment, preventing the switch from properly reading the water pressure.
 
  #4  
Old 06-27-12, 07:22 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
Now that I have a couple more seconds....

In order of probability, check or have checked by a pro;
- Pilot Dane's suggestion of a leaking pipe or joint (never seen a pressure relief valve on a well before)
- Pressure switch (generally a grey box attached to the inlet pipe). Possibly a mechanical failure (broken spring, stuck contact, etc).
- Preasure switch is getting bad readings due to settlment inside the pipe (less likely).
- Pump control box has a failed closed relay (pretty unlikely as these are designed to fail open)

The gauge reading would be a good start. In most cases, it should be no higher then ~60PSI.
 
  #5  
Old 06-27-12, 10:35 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
thanks

hey both you guys thanks one more question can i just pull the control pannel fuse to cut power and put back in when i need more water if i need to (live out of the way so it may be a couple of days till a guy can come out and look)


thanks again guys
Benn
 
  #6  
Old 06-27-12, 11:03 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
looked at pump

ok gauge reading was 80-85 then the relief kicks in and drops down to 70 then goes off again till it goes back up to 85 the relief value that i was talkin about is under the pressure gage pulled control box cover the pump stopped and pressure went down to 70 instantley will put back when i need water
 
  #7  
Old 06-28-12, 04:16 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
I would hope that your well pump is on it's own breaker/fuse in the main pannel. I would suggest turning off the power at that point instead of pulling a fuse from your controller box. The controller box is more then likely not setup for pulling the fuse while powered, so there is a high risk of shock and/or spark, which can cause damage and pose a risk to who ever is pulling it.

The pressure you are getting is way to high and can burn out your pump and/or damage your pipework or pressure tank. If you haven't sprung a leak at those pressures, congrads, you have a solid system.

Based on the information you provided, I would lean more towards the pressure switch being faulty.
Unfortunately I have not had to play with mine yet, so I can't even really suggest what to look for or how to test it. If it was the main control box (starter box) I could suggest stuff, but I haven't touched my pressure switch yet.
 
  #8  
Old 06-28-12, 07:44 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,953
Received 2,225 Upvotes on 1,986 Posts
Pressure switches are relatively inexpensive. I'd install a new one. First make sure that power to the well pump circuit is off and confirm that you have no current going to the pressure switch with a tester. After the power is off open a faucet and let the water run until it stops to relieve the pressure in the system, then you can start working.
 
  #9  
Old 06-28-12, 08:16 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
To further Pilot Dane's point, if you don't already own a tester or multimeter, pick up a multimeter. Way more useful and if you don't go high end, you can get a decent unit for a couple dollars more then a straight power tester (light with two sticks).
I think I remember seeing a cheap multimeter at a local hardware store for around the $25 price point. Might be cheaper where you are as us Canadians tend to pay more for some stuff.
 
  #10  
Old 06-28-12, 09:17 AM
V
Vey
Vey is offline
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Mid-Florida
Posts: 1,201
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
"one more question can i just pull the control pannel fuse to cut power and put back in when i need more water if i need to"

Phew. I'm glad you asked before doing that. Better to cut the power at the circuit breaker.

By co-incidence I was reviewing the NFPA 70E to make sure I was still complying with it. Pulling a fuse on a live 240VAC circuit would be H/RC-1. Even just testing the voltage presents a hazard because the probes can contact each other.
 
  #11  
Old 06-28-12, 05:46 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
thanks all

will try pressure switch first and by the way what does H/rc-1 mean
 
  #12  
Old 06-28-12, 06:56 PM
V
Vey
Vey is offline
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Mid-Florida
Posts: 1,201
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
"what does H/rc-1 mean"

I didn't want to scare you, but here it is. I hope I get this right.
HRC = Health Risk Category. They range from 0 to 4 provided the work is under 600 volts.

Pulling a 240 fuse or testing voltage on a "live" branch circuit over 50 volts = HRC 1.

HRC 1 (according to the table) requires the following Personal Protection Equipment to do the job safely:
First the electrocution hazard --
1. Rubber Insulated gloves with leather protectors that leave at least 1/2" rubber showing above the leather. For 240 volts, that is class 00 (500V) or class 0 (1000 V). I use class 0 gloves.
2. Insulated tools (for pulling a fuse, that means a fuse puller. For voltage testing, the leads have to be insulated, which just about all are.)

The insulated gloves must have been certified (by a proper laboratory -- natch) within the last 6 months. They cost on the neighborhood of $60-90 and the leathers are another $30. Re-certification is $6.50, but you have to pay the freight both ways, so that's another $11.

Then we get to clothing to prevent horrible disfigurement should you accidentally cause an arc flash:
1. 100% cotton underwear
2. An arc rated long sleeve shirt and arc rated trousers -OR-
3. Arc Rated coveralls (this is what I use because I don't do this all day like an electrician does)
4. Arc Rated Face Shield with sides and chin cover
5. Hard Hat
6. Safety Glasses w/side shields (these are wonderful things and you can buy them now with removable shields so that they look like dress glasses)
7. Ear canal hearing protection
8. Leather work shoes

I'm not an electrician, I just maintain things. If an electrician or HVAC man reads this, he may have something to add. It can get a lot more detailed than what I laid out.

This is not a joke. 25 years ago, nobody had any of this stuff and everybody I knew worked "naked." Now, it's a requirement on some job sites, soon I expect it to be most job sites. Since I own it, I use the stuff when I need to even if I don't have Big General Contracting Company looking over my shoulder demanding I do everything by the book.

Take my word for it. It's much cheaper and safer to work on de-energized circuits and equipment. I accidentally caused an arc flash once and it was on 208 volts. It was just an itty-bitty one. Nothing like what they have on You Tube. Still, it was scary enough. I call it "the boom heard 'round the world." No damage to me or the equipment, but let me tell you -- I don't never want it to happen again.

If you are going to test the voltage without investing $500, the safest way is to find an assistant. You concentrate on holding the leads in the right place while the assistant holds the meter and reads you the meter readings. We did it for years, naked like I said, and we did it pretty safely that way. It's when you divert your eyes to read the meter, trouble can happen.
 

Last edited by Vey; 06-28-12 at 07:52 PM.
  #13  
Old 06-29-12, 04:16 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
Vey,
You wouldn't happen to be a safety guy or a recently out of school electrical guy would you?

To the OP, general rule of thumb is to kill the power at the pannel. A de-energized system won't suddently start on you and the pannel is designed to protect the operator when opening and closing live circuits.
If you can see where the fuse makes contact while the fuse is installed, it's probably not the place to kill the power.
 
  #14  
Old 06-29-12, 04:53 AM
V
Vey
Vey is offline
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Mid-Florida
Posts: 1,201
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I'm not a safety guy. Technically, I am exempt from just about everything because I am not an employee, nor do I employ anyone. My little business is expanding and as I go along and do more work in more commercial places, I just had to get safer. I mean, how can I control a circuit breaker in another room without a lockout device? Some janitor comes along and it is bye-bye Vey.

It's the coming thing even though the old-timers are not exactly happy about it. They, and I, have a hard time believing that what we were doing was as dangerous as it was. Seeing as how I live in Florida, even wearing long sleeves is an imposition.

But, on a pragmatic level, the committee that writes the NFPA 70E has science on their side. They are more than happy to show their videos of what happens even if a minor mistake is made even on "low" voltage circuits. You can see the whole thing on a mannequin. The insurance companies are buying it and whatever they buy into, contractors and subcontractors must comply. The old-timers have a choice, either comply or retire. I'm too young to retire.

And if truth be told, the old-timers used to tell stories about the close calls they had.
 
  #15  
Old 06-29-12, 05:06 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
I had to ask as I don't know too many people who would refer to safety or risk levels as you did.
I won't get started on the long sleeves in really warm conditions. A couple years ago I was working in a processing plant commissioning some Long sleeve shirt, gloves, glasses and a hardhat when the temp was over 35'C outside the building is not fun.
 
  #16  
Old 06-29-12, 08:25 PM
V
Vey
Vey is offline
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Mid-Florida
Posts: 1,201
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I got a couple of PMs and my heart sank. I thought for sure it was the moderators yelling at me again, but it wasn't. Sometimes they don't appreciate my bluntness. I call 'em like I see 'um and sometimes that upsets people.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: