Constant pressure from well

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Old 08-03-12, 08:24 PM
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Constant pressure from well

I know about the expensive route of installing a variable-speed pump and controller to keep the water pressure constant.

But would this work...

Jack up the settings on the pump switch from 40/60 to something like 60/80. Then add a pressure reducing valve set at say 50 psi right after the pressure tank. Since the well pump would kick back on before the pressure went below 50 psi, shouldn't this give me a constant water pressure at my faucets? Of course, that's assuming the pressure tank doesn't blow!
 
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Old 08-04-12, 06:33 AM
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First I have to ask why constant pressure is so important? If the pressure switch and tank are set up properly it's pretty hard to notice the changes in pressure.

But yes, your idea sounds like it would work. It sounds similar to what you'd have on city water with your well taking the place of the municipal supply. Just make sure your pressure switch is on the high pressure side of the reducing valve.
 
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Old 08-05-12, 06:11 AM
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I put in a tankless water heater about 1-1/2 years ago. We love it for the most part...especially my wife who no longer runs out of hot water filling her giant tub. I noticed fluctuation with the temp of the hot water when I shower though. I called tech support and we traced it back to the change in flow rates. You don't notice it as the pressure gradually drops as water is used. When the pump kicks in the pressure/changes very quickly for a few seconds. The increased flow means the water heater has to ramp up to keep the water at the same temperature. There is a short lag between where the temp drops. It is only a few degrees, but it is noticeable. The same happens when there is another draw on the system, like the washing machine for example. The sudden increase in flow creates a brief temp. drop before the water heater makes up for it. Then again a short increase in temp when the washer stops filling and the flow slows down.

The tech rep suggested a "constant pressure valve" which no plumbing supply store in my area had a clue what I was talking about until I figured out that it was a "pressure reducing valve".

I went to the well company that installed my well (18 yrs ago). They said I had to install a whole new system - var. speed pump etc.

In the mean time I've learned to live with sometimes having to tap the shower valve to adjust the temp., but it would be nice to fix it.
 
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Old 08-05-12, 02:36 PM
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Have you gone through and checked the air pressure in your pressure tank and your pump's cut in and out pressures? Maybe there is some tuning that can be done to improve your system's performance.
 
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Old 08-07-12, 11:57 AM
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"The tech rep suggested a "constant pressure valve" which no plumbing supply store in my area had a clue what I was talking about until I figured out that it was a "pressure reducing valve".

I went to the well company that installed my well (18 yrs ago). They said I had to install a whole new system - var. speed pump etc."


There used to be a poster here that was really big on those valves. He recommended them over the variable speed pumps because from what he said and what I have heard elsewhere, if you think you got troubles now, you ain't seen nothing yet. Expensive and prone to trouble, not my cup of tea.

I was kind of amazed when Pilot Dane said that the pressure change was hardly noticeable when the pressure tank ran out and all pressure came from the pump. I guess I have never lived anywhere where the well had such wonderful, voluminous output. Consequently, I have complained for years that the new tanks the sell at the Big Box stores are too small. A 42 gallon tank = ~17 gallons and that is not enough for a busy family.

So here is a thought . . . what if you were to increase the tank capacity? I know one guy here that has a 500 gallon pressure tank, which at 60PSI = ~ 220 gallons of water capacity. Believe me, he never runs out of water when he takes a shower.

Did you know you can manifold tanks together?
There is tons of good info on that site.
 

Last edited by waterwelldude; 08-07-12 at 08:49 PM.
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Old 08-07-12, 02:42 PM
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Oh my goodness! So many problems with the variable speed constant pressure systems today. I have tried to show people on this forum how to fix these problems in the past, and was reprimanded for promoting a “product”. So I don’t help out much here anymore, because they won’t let me show how to solve these problems. Maybe with all these problems with variable speed pumps on this forum today, they might actually let me show how to solve these problems but you will need my “product”.

The Cycle Stop Valve was designed to replace variable speed pumps almost 20 years ago. It is completely mechanical, long lasting, simple, inexpensive, works with very small pressure tank, and makes pumps last many times longer than normal.

Larger pressure tanks just makes the time with low pressure take that much longer. And a pressure reducing valve on the discharge of the tank may give you steady pressure but, will still let the pump cycle itself to death. A Cycle Stop Valve is placed before the pressure tank. It will deliver the constant pressure you need for things like instant water heater, and keeps your pump from cycling as well.


I hope the mods don’t mind if I answer these questions as it doesn’t seem anyone else knows about them, and Constant Pressure Valves are all I do.
 

Last edited by waterwelldude; 08-07-12 at 08:50 PM.
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Old 08-08-12, 05:01 AM
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If I was Zinger, the OP, I would PM Valveguy for the links. The moderator cut my links out as well as his on the basis that we linked to people that were "selling something."
 
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Old 08-08-12, 05:15 AM
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Vey, re-read my post. I never said "...when the pressure tank ran out and all pressure came from the pump..." That condition would be very noticeable. That is why the pressure tank air pressure should be set about 2 psi lower than the pump cut in pressure. This insures that there is always water in the pressure tank and the air is working as a cushion to smooth pressure fluctuation.
 
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