septic tank filter


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Old 11-05-12, 06:40 AM
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septic tank filter

Hi,

I have a 1000gal septic tank with a filter that is gravity fed to the leachfield. I have developed a schedule to clean the filter every 6 mos which, in my opinion, is too often but better than replacing the line to the leachfield. My concern is that when I open the tank to access the filter, it is completely underwater. To remove it, I have to reach in and feel for the handle. It's fine, I guess, but is that normal? Additionally, is there an easier way to access the filter? I have to dig through my lawn 2x per year to access the tank.

Finally, I was told to add yeast to the system every month or so. Is there any other preventative maintenance that I should be doing?

Thanks for your help with the glamorous side of home-ownership.

Anthony
 
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Old 11-05-12, 06:46 AM
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If that filter is under water I would say you have an issue with the leach field.

Yeast or any additives are a waste of money and do nothing IMO.

I would only recommend aerobic bacteria additive on an aeration type system only. But that's a whole other thread that I started last year or so.

Search my threads for my septic tank posts on seepage pit and read it. Then post back with any questions.
 
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Old 11-05-12, 07:48 AM
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Thanks, Mike.

I've read one of your posts so far. I do have a question regarding your response to my post. When I pull the filter, the water drains out the outlet. If I had an issue with the leachfield, would the water drain when I pull the filter?

I wouldn't mind pulling the filter if there was an easier way to access it.
 
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Old 11-05-12, 08:04 AM
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What type of filter do you have?

Mine is like this and is the bristle brush type. Instead of a lid to my septic oulet as shown I extended the pvc to grade and put a clean out cap there.
 
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Old 11-05-12, 09:41 AM
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Many filters have a ball inside that shuts off the flow to the drain field when the filter is removed for cleaning. Are you removing the entire filter assembly or just the filter/core portion.
 
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Old 11-05-12, 03:49 PM
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I'm not sure of the brand, but my filter may be a Tuf-Tite filter and it looks like this. I assume it is not a bristle brush type. Can this type be extended and, if so, how do you cap the tank? I remove the entire filter, it's plastic, and about 1ft long.

This brings me to another question: Why do I need a filter? I get the premise but many people that I know don't have a filter on their tanks.
 
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Old 11-05-12, 05:21 PM
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Filters are a relatively new thing. They can be a nuisance to clean if they become clogged but if that material gets out into your leach field it can eventually clog it possibly leading to some very expensive repair. I think they are now required in most areas on new installs or must be added when a repair is done to an older system.

Like your picture shows, you should only remove the yellow filter core and leave the outer housing in place. That type does not appear to have a shutoff that blocks the flow when the filter is removed so I'd make the filter cleaning as fast as possible to reduce the amount of unwanted stuff making it's way out to your drain field. Technically, I think they recommend that the tank be pumped before removing the filter for cleaning for just that reason.

This is the filter I use. When the filter core is removed the flow is stopped so you can clean it without pumping the tank.




When you asked about extending. Did you mean add more filtration capacity, extend the filter handle up higher or add a access riser to your tank?
 
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Old 11-05-12, 08:19 PM
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Thanks again. There is no way to clean the filter fast enough without the water level dropping. As soon as I pull out the filter, the water rushes into the drain pipe and the water levels out after about 20 seconds. Should I consider getting another type of filter?

I asked about extending to make it easier to access the filter. As it exists now, I have to dig up the lawn, dig through 6" of loam, uncover the tank, and remove the filter. There must be a way to access the filter.
 
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Old 11-06-12, 06:06 AM
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Most septic tank companies, the people that make septic tanks, keep various risers in stock since they are so commonly used. And, because septic tanks are cheap, big & heavy most towns have a tank manufacturer so you should be able to pick one up locally. My tank company has them just as plastic rings and they also offer it with a concrete skirt. Both are easy to install. Simply uncover the top of the tank where you want it to go. Wash off the tank to remove all the dirt and get to clean concrete. Then a soft rubber gasket is put between the tank and riser and it glues the two together. Make sure you ask for the gasket because they are usually not included with the risers.

I use the type shown in the second picture, mainly because it's what I can get locally. It's light enough to pick up and carry and you just screw sections together to get the height you want.





As for the filter, yes I would switch to a filter that has an automatic shutoff. The one I showed in the earlier picture costs about $50. If you get the adapter shown below installation is easy. Just hammer this adapter into your existing pipe and then glue on the filter. You may have to have the level of your tank pumped down a foot so you can work without splashing poo about.

 
 

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