Pressure Tank Does Not Fill, Pump Running


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Old 11-27-12, 03:41 AM
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Pressure Tank Does Not Fill, Pump Running

So we have a wellpump, 1hp out of an artesian spring well. Rise is approx 40 ft max. Feeds a pressure tank (bladder type) 36 gallon with a Pressure Switch set at 20 and 40. The piping is old style black ductile.

This is a seasonal residence, so the water is shut off and tank drained every time we leave the house.

Last time, the pump was started, the tank would only fill a little bit. The pump kicked on at 20 psi, rose rapidly to 40 psi and kicked off. Tank is light and obviously not full. The water in the house works, obviously, but its maybe two toilet flushes or the shower in use and the pump starts to short cycle to supply water to the system.

My thoughts

1. there is water pressure with the pump running but not for showers. Pump seems to be OK
2. the pressure switch rises rapidly indicating pressure in the tank. Faulty switch?
3. the pressure switch rises rapidly.... clogged inlet or tank pipes?
4. Faulty tank that is over pressurized?
5. Faulty bladder in the tank? Its not waterlogged - i can lift it myself

I only have a day or two to fix need to know the steps to troubleshoot and get repaired quickly (or call a plumber).

Thanks
 
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Old 11-27-12, 03:44 AM
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Additional INformation

I forgot to ADD - the well is not dry - ever. I checked at the driest point this fall and we still had full depth of water and the spring was still running.
 
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Old 11-27-12, 05:32 AM
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The fact that there is minimal water in the tank points to a blocked pipe between the pump and tank.

Is there possibly a closed valve between the two that was overlooked?



.
 
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Old 11-27-12, 09:11 AM
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Its a straight shot from the pressure valve to the tank, no valves. I can hear the water trickle into the tank a little. This is also 1-1/2" pipe so it would have to be a major block to close that off i think.
 
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Old 11-27-12, 09:45 AM
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It's black pipe.....corrosion and minerals could have been building up for years.

Also.....when you say "Its a straight shot from the pressure valve to the tank"

What is this valve you are referring to?



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Old 11-27-12, 01:46 PM
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With the tank empty,and not under pressure, what pressure do you have the tank set at? You will need a compressed air source and a tire gauge? It is possible the air pressure in the tank is too great.
 
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Old 11-28-12, 03:37 AM
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correction - PRESSURE SWITCH - no valves between the pressure switch and the tank.

Tank is at 18 psi when at rest with no water - 2psi below the low cutoff
 
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Old 11-28-12, 11:15 AM
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Hi sthorva


Im a newbie and dont want to waste your time or mislead you, but Im pretty sure of the following 2 thoughts:

1. The pressure switch should be close to the tank, no more than 6 away. Its usually right at the tank on a tee.

2. Sometimes the little riser nipple connecting the pressure switch to the main water pipe can block with buildup causing pressure problems in the house. Its not a very difficult job to check/replace that riser pipe (i.e., the short nipple). (Seems like a block there would cause overpressure at the tank, but who knows?LOL)

Good luck!
 
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Old 12-19-12, 04:37 PM
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collapsed bladder?

You could have a collapsed bladder inside the pressure tank. Since it is seasonal and you drain the lines and tank when not in use the bladder would deflate. I have read where these bladders can collapse on themselves and the rubber sticks to itself, preventing reinflation. I recently had a different situation where my water pressure was low and the pump was running all the time and never hit the cut off pressure. I did a whole lot of research on line and read what I describe above. In my case, and you might do this to just as a maintenance thing or to rule out the possibility, I checked my pressure switch and the nipple tube leading to it. Shut off power to pump at the breaker box, the pump and pressure switch should be on the same line. Disconnect wiring to switch. Put a pipe wrench on the nipple tube and unscrew it from the piping and the pressure switch. Check that there is not gunk accumulated in the pipe. Mine had a 1/2" of crude in there. Clean it out and clean pressure switch. Reinstall being sure to put pipe tape on the threads. In my case, after ruling out all other possibilities, it was determined my pump had failed after 16 years. Impeller stages were sheared from the shaft. I replaced the pump and all is well now. I don't think it is your pump since you are getting pressure high enough to turn off the pressure switch. I think it is a collapsed bladder preventing the well pump from filling. At a drained state you have the correct tank pressure of 18 psi. If it was in a full state the pressure in that tank should read somewhere around 40-60 psi. Since you aren't getting water in the tank this sounds to me to be the most logical choice to look at.
 
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Old 12-21-12, 04:06 PM
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Pressure Tank

I have a Air pressure tank set at 60/40. For some reason the pressure will no longer go above 56 PSI and constantly runs. Do I need a new tank?
 
 

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