No water pressure in the house or at the head??


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Old 02-09-13, 10:49 AM
W
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No water pressure in the house or at the head??

I really hope this is not a pump again. This would be the 4th in 2 years and the 3rd Miller!!! The other night we lost pressure in the house. I thought it was because my daughter took a bath in the garden tub and my son who stays in there 30 minutes took a shower right after and in the mean time the washing achine was running. This has never been a problem before now.

I went out to the head and had very little pressure. What really turns my stomach is that I can hear the pump humming. The well is 320' down and the pump is probably 50+ feet below the water line or at least it was 6 months ago. I really would hope that this could be a pressure switch but based on the symptoms Iam seriously doubting it...

Any suggestions or advice???

Thanks
Wade
 
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Old 02-09-13, 10:58 AM
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What does the psi say when this happens? Possible the bladder air charge needs to be checked. But if yoyr changing pumps 2x's a year I would think there is another issue. What are the pump failures? Possibly the pump is not getting full voltage?
 
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Old 02-09-13, 10:59 AM
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I can hear the pump humming.
If you can hear the pump running then it's not a pressure switch issue.
 
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Old 02-09-13, 11:11 AM
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A buddy of mine is an electrician and will be over in a little while to check the voltage. Right now the pressure will build if you let it sit for a while but then loses pretty quick.
 
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Old 02-09-13, 11:15 AM
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Drain the tank and check the air charge. If you have 40/60 switch set the psi in the tank to say 35psi.

Let us know what the electrician says.
 
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Old 02-09-13, 04:08 PM
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After verifying 220 and doing the continity check. We finally just pulled the pump again. 320' later it was out. Pump and line had a lot of silt\sand\sediment on it. A friend who is a local plumber was not able to come over but said that it sounds like the blader tank went bad causing the pump to continue to run until it burned up. We did turn the pump on once it was out and it did run but was not nearly as quiet as it was when I put it in 6 months ago. Luckily the pump is still under warranty and I have a new bladder tank under a second house we are getting ready to have moved. So hopefully all this will cost me is time.
We did tie a weight to a string and lowered it into the well to make sure it was not dry. From the measurments we got the water is about 30' deep and the pump is about 20' into it and 10' above the bottom.
All this sound about right?
 
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Old 02-09-13, 05:10 PM
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it sounds like the blader tank went bad causing the pump to continue to run until it burned up.
No.....not quite.

If the tank was the issue the pump would short cycle. The pressure would rise quickly and the pump would shut off. When you used water the pressure would drop quickly causing the pump to come on almost immediately. The tank is there as a ballast. It keeps the pump from short cycling.

You found the pump clogged with silt and sediment. Most likely that was the cause of your problem. That same sand and silt will also render the check valve useless which would allow the water that was just pumped to return back to the well.

Not to hijack this thread but I just watched This Old House and they were working on a problem deep well. Shaft over 300'. They kept the pump up 50' from the bottom to allow the silt to drain. The pump was in 40' of water.

I am not a well guy but I would say 10' from the bottom of your pump to the bottom of the well is not enough distance to eliminate the pump churn......hence the silt and sediment.

Ultimately the distances will come down to water table and refresh rate. You may need to bring in a well company for help.
 
 

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