Increase Water Pressure


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Old 03-09-14, 02:37 PM
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Increase Water Pressure

I have a 20 gallon Water Ace Diaphragm Pressure Tank, Model # RPT20 4340A506.

I would like to increase the water pressure in the house.

The tank turns on at ~35psi and off at ~50psi and settles to ~45psi.

If I'm correct, the two springs in the black box control the cut in and cut off pressure. To increase the water pressure in the house I need to turn each nut clockwise a quarter of a turn, check the cut in and cut off pressure. After that I need to get a pressure gauge (and an air tank) and increase the pre-charge pressure in the tank to two (2) pounds below the cut in pressure, (i.e. - if the cut in pressure is 40psi the pre-charge pressure must be 38psi). Check the water pressure. Repeat until desired pressure is reached.

Do I need to turn the power off before doing this? Will turning off power to the pressure tank cause anything negative to happen?

There are also two shut offs. One before the pressure tank, and one after. Should I shut off either of them while increasing the water pressure? (I was told by a tech who replaced the electric water heater to never use the shut off before the pressure tank).

Does the cut off pressure need to be 10psi more than the cut in pressure?

Is there anything I have wrong?

Is there a different procedure altogether I should follow?
 
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Old 03-09-14, 04:58 PM
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Turn off the circuit breaker to your well pump before making adjustments to your pressure switch. If the power is on and your wrench slips you'll hear a "pop" and see sparks. Turning the power off spares you the fireworks.

There is no required difference between cut in/on and out/off pressure. 20 psi is most common and that much pressure swing is generally not noticeable if the air in the pressure tank is set correctly. Having a smaller spread means smoother water pressure but the pump will cycle on and off more frequently which can shorten it's life a bit so you don't want it to be too close.
 
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Old 03-09-14, 05:28 PM
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The pre charge in the tank is set when the tank is empty. Pump off, open the faucet and allow the tank to push the water out. You'll see when the flow suddenly comes to a trickle and the system pressure reads zero. Set the pre charge and turn the pump back on to fill the tank.
 
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Old 03-09-14, 06:49 PM
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Did you just notice a drop in water pressure in the house? 35psi to 50psi is a lot of pressure.
 
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Old 03-09-14, 07:54 PM
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More likely the reason you think you have low pressure is under sized plumbing or old steel pipes.
You need at least 3/4 home runs.
 
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Old 03-10-14, 07:15 AM
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Can you tell us why you need to increase the pressure above 50 psi?
 
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Old 03-10-14, 06:55 PM
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(I was told by a tech who replaced the electric water heater to never use the shut off before the pressure tank).
Thomas I believe the reason you should not shut off that valve is because that valve is in between the pump and the pressure switch. When the pressure switch activates the pump, the pressure switch will keep the pump going until the pressure switch sees the cut-off pressure. Thatís how it normally works.

But since the valve is closed, the pressure switch will not see a pressure increase and will keep the pump going - and all the time the pump will be pumping against a closed valve. Guess thatís not very good for the pump. Donít know how long the pump could last like that.

Maybe the other guys can explain it better, but I think thatís why you shouldnít ever close that valve. I donít think a valve in that location is very common. Wonder why some people do it?
 
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Old 05-05-14, 03:29 PM
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Sorry for never getting back.

I had a plumber friend investigate and my water softener system is causing the pressure issues. I'm going to call a RainSoft specialist this week after I figure out what's going on with my septic system.
 
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Old 05-05-14, 03:43 PM
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Thanks for stopping back ....IIIt sounds like you have your hands full there.
 
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Old 05-09-14, 11:32 AM
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This has been the month from hell.

New heat pump and air handler, getting ready to re-mortar the risers to my septic tank, the water softener is having issues, I need a new cylinder head in my truck, and my new laptop has a loose screw in it and sounds like a maraca.

If the other shoe hasn't dropped already, I'm in trouble!
 
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Old 05-10-14, 07:23 PM
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This has been the month from hell.

New heat pump and air handler, getting ready to re-mortar the risers to my septic tank, the water softener is having issues, I need a new cylinder head in my truck, and my new laptop has a loose screw in it and sounds like a maraca.

If the other shoe hasn't dropped already, I'm in trouble!


thomas I'm working on your post, trying to put it to music. Sounds like a good country song. lol
 
 

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