Help installing a 2nd pit for a battery backed up sump pump.

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Old 06-22-14, 10:36 AM
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Help installing a 2nd pit for a battery backed up sump pump.

I live on a moderate floodplain and the house is surrounded with drainage tiles that end up in the well in my basement. I've lived here for 3 years and I've already replaced my sump pump twice. The first time was partially my fault because I didn't replace the check valve and I didn't make the 1/16" hole in the discharge pipe below well level. At the same time, my drainage backed up completely back in January and my drain to the street needed to be rodded out.

The point is, I'm not looking forward to having to re-install a sump pump knee deep in freezing water any time in the near future....

I have a dirt crawl space. I have one well that discharges the water vertically through a check valve (which I understand is a big no-no). The current well is cement walls that were cracked open rather unceremonously so drainage from the basement shower could make its way in. Meanwhile, the well was so damaged that I'm sure gallons of water are saturated by the surrounding top soil for hours before the pump ever goes off.


I'm thinking about building two entirely new wells. This would allow me to install a check valve horizontally for the system rather than vertically. I'm also considering leaving the existing well as-is because it was the drainage for the shower and sink in the basement bathroom. I would have to drill a hole toward the bottom through the concrete to install a pipe that went to the well for the primary pump.



Any ideas or suggestions?

I've never done plumbing work this extensive before and was wondering what some of you would do if you had a few hundred bucks and a blank slate to work with.
 
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Old 06-22-14, 10:48 AM
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we install battery back-up pumps but, IF you're on city water, a better suggestion is a wtr-power'd backup pump,,, batt b/u's are limited by size & power supply - wtr rarely quits IF its municipal, etc
 
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Old 06-22-14, 10:54 AM
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Hey stadry

WTR backup? Not sure what you mean by that.

I've lived here for 3 years and the only two times I've ever had a problem with water in the basement were the two times my pumps went out.

I've had 3 power outages that lasted more than a few seconds that ad up to rougly 10 hours and those were never a problem. Chances are, I don't even need the second pump for a power outage or a massive storm. It would be nice to know that I have a secondary unit that would kick in if the main unit dies again though. The next time I install a sump pump in this basement I want to be doing it on dry land.
 
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Old 06-22-14, 11:10 AM
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Wtr = water powered sump pump. It's a pump that uses city water to actually do the pumping. For every gallon of city water used.... two are discharged.

Meanwhile, the well was so damaged that I'm sure gallons of water are saturated by the surrounding top soil for hours before the pump ever goes off.
If the water is next to the house it needs to be let into the pit. You can't seal the pit. ANY water needs to be allowed in. If you have water issues from saturated ground around the house then you need to direct the water away from the house thru grading or extended downspouts.
 
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Old 06-22-14, 12:02 PM
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WTR seems excessive.

I had a post that took too long to write before posting so it was lost.


I'll sum it up quick now.

BEFORE: (First pic at bottom)

(THEORETICAL) AFTER: (Second pic at bottom)



The cracks in the concrete original well are still there, but I've used the best "Bondo" you guys recommend to make it solid around the entry and exit pipes.
 
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Old 06-22-14, 12:15 PM
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IF you can successfully seal the wall from the interior ( you're ONLY sealing the surface you can see - NOT the wall ), that means wtr is still entering the wall where it causes unseen damage,,, iow, there are no surface coatings that can permanently stop wtr as it will find a way to fill a void,,, try making a hole in a tub full of water if you don't believe it

1 can inject a crk ( we use hydrophyllic polyurethane grout ) which will seal the crk thereby preventing wtr from entering.

pumps derive power from several sources - electricity is 1, hydraulic's another, some are even water-power'd ( WOW ! ) Zoeller 503-0005 Homeguard Max Water Powered Emergency Backup Pump System - Sump Pumps - Amazon.com OR Home Guard® Max - Zoeller Pump Company

IF 1 thinks of their basement as a ship's hull below the waterline, its much easier to understand
 
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Old 06-27-14, 05:01 PM
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I'm ordering two of these.

Amazon.com: Parts2O FPW73-19 18-Inch Sump Basin: Home Improvement

I think I'll just go to a 2-well service, since the concrete will never be repairable and not leak.

For the main well, I already know where the 4" drainage comes in from the outside as well as the 1 1/2" drain from the shower comes in, under the floor.

I'll put that high drain for when the main doesn't work, into the second well, and the second well will be a battery backup sump.
 
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