Sump pump behavior during storm last week


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Old 12-01-14, 01:37 PM
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Sump pump behavior during storm last week

Hi all,

So, I had a plumber replace my sump pump (with a Zoeller M57) when the added the backup water powered sump.

I've only lived in the house a year, and never noticed the old pump running. This pump, I happened to be in the basement, and heard it kick on. Seems like it gets a certain amount of water then turns on--once the water in the pit drops, it turns off. Makes sense.

What I am wondering is if the pump is pumping 'too fast'? During the storm, it would turn on, and turn off within a minute. More like withing 30 seconds. Then, a few minutes later, it would cycle like that again.

I'm wondering if I need to adjust the float? Let more water enter the pit before kicking on the pump? But then, what if we have a more powerful storm and water enters the pit even faster?

Any advice? Setup fine?
 
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Old 12-01-14, 02:13 PM
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How deep and big around is the pit?
99% of the time the reason a sump pump is even needed is because of what's going on outside of the house around the foundation.
Grade running away from the house.
Working gutters with down spouts at least 10 ft. away from the foundation.
No mulch pulled up against the foundation and no landscape timbers forming ponds.
Foundation should have been water proofed before back filling.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 05:47 PM
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In a general sense, it is better if you let more water into the pit before the pump starts.

The disadvantage is that, if the water level in the drainage system fluctuates higher, there could be flooding of the far side of the basement.

Most sump pits are too small. This leads to frequent short pump cycles which are disadvantageous for the pump.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 06:37 AM
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How deep and big around is the pit?
...
Grade running away from the house.
---
Working gutters with down spouts at least 10 ft. away from the foundation.
...
No mulch pulled up against the foundation
...

Foundation should have been water proofed before back filling.
...
Thanks!

I have to measure the pit. First time homeowner. Just celebrated one year of tasks... I mean the joy of home ownership

Grade is sloped away from foundation.

Gutters are dropping no where near 10'... More like 5' (longest) and 4" (everywhere else). I am seeing a drywell in my future I have two that I cant extend without a tripping hazard

Mulch. Well, we inherited a house with mulch right up to the foundation. Might need to look into that. Guessing gravel replacement?

I have no idea as to whether they waterproofed before backfilling. *knocks on wood*... Dont see any water in the basment. Pit is dry 99.999% of the time
 
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Old 12-02-14, 09:04 AM
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this is the heart of my question. Whether to adjust the float or leave it be...
 
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Old 12-02-14, 05:05 PM
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Remove mulch and gravel and sand and other porous material on the surface next to the foundation and replace with dense material such as loam and clay.

Adjusting the pump float will be trial and error. You should allow a week of wet weather and sump pump operation to determine whether the new float setting will work out well.
 
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Old 12-03-14, 07:44 AM
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When the sump pump is cycling rapidly, check to see how fast water is flowing into the sump during the storm cycle. If the flow rate is high then you need to have the pump running to keep water out of the basement. We live on gravel ground and during storm events the water table rises enough that our sump pump runs almost constantly.
 
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Old 12-10-14, 03:04 AM
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zoeller is the standard of the wtrproofing trade however plumbers usually don't have the training/experience for the work,,, we use zoeller exclusively &, in particular, the m53 pump,,, don't f w/the float or float switch - both the pump & zoeller are smarter than all of us you might want to add a pump stand ( zoro.com ) + be sure your sump meets the measurements of the zoeller sump zoro sell but that's about it - good luck !
 
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Old 12-10-14, 02:04 PM
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thanks! appreciate all the feedback!
 
 

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