Well water without sediment filter?

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Old 06-15-15, 08:19 AM
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Question Well water without sediment filter?

We're looking to purchase a 30 year old house that has well water. Best we can tell there is no sediment filter, certainly isn't one in the water equipment room where I can clearly see the water inlet from the well pump along with a pressure tank and a no longer used water softener setup. The owners are clueless so even if there is a filter they haven't changed it recently. Water tests came back great: soft water, low minerals and low turbidity (.09 NTU).

I haven't owned a home with well water in many years but recall my sediment filter would be brown and loaded with sediment every time I changed it, I'm concerned the plumbing and appliances in this house could be damaged by the lack of filter, any thoughts? Any way to flush the house plumbing or assess the extent of any damage?

Thanks.
 
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Old 06-15-15, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by greystone_way
". . . Water tests came back great: soft water, low minerals and low turbidity (.09 NTU) . . ."
But you sound so disappointed !
 
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Old 06-15-15, 10:37 AM
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It all depends on the well. Some need filters and some don't and you can add a filter if you wish. I wouldn't go into it expecting things to be damaged just because you once had a house that needed a filter. I don't worry about the shoelaces on my new shoes just because the laces broke on a pair of shoes I had 5 years ago.
 
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Old 06-15-15, 11:19 AM
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Some strange replies here. I'm not disappointed about the water test results, quite the opposite. But I don't know enough about the testing to know if it would report on sediment passing through and causing issues with the plumbing. Just because there was no sediment in the sample doesn't mean that at other times the well pump might not pickup debris.

I've never seen a well water house without a sediment filter, it seems like a simple safeguard that has minimal downside but significant benefits. I was looking to get some insight from those who are more knowledgeable about the idea of having no filter and any issues that might come up.
 
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Old 06-15-15, 11:41 AM
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For the most part a sediment filter doesn't hurt but in some wells it doesn't help much. Some people run New York City water through a filter even though it's often regarded as some of the best water in the country right from the tap. The extra filtration doesn't hurt but how much does it help? A filter is one more component that can leak and needs maintenance and it create a flow resistance so they are not without penalty.
 
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Old 06-15-15, 01:43 PM
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On the other hand, a filter does not have to leak, and a properly sized one is going to cause very minimal restriction, so, if it provides any peace of mind, I would vote for installing one. You could drain some water out of the water tank or hot water tank, but, especially if this has not been done on a regular basis, you could create a leak in a valve at the water tank, or, in the case of the hot water tank, could create a scenario for premature failure. So I doubt that I would or would even ask to do either on someone else's home, as long as all other indicators were good, but they are things that you could do once you assumed responsibility for them.
 
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Old 06-15-15, 03:17 PM
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I suppose I should admit that I have a sediment filter on my well system. Years ago when the well was new it was catching a good amount but over the years it has decreased dramatically so I now I question if it's needed.
 
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Old 06-16-15, 10:26 AM
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The Earth itself has been serving as a good filter of the water that gets into our aquifers

It has been recycling and filtering water for millions of years.

And the deeper the well, the better the natural filtration (usually).
 
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Old 06-16-15, 11:27 AM
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much more important than the sediment filter is a proper iron filter, imo. the chem free models work quite well. without one of these you will foul your softener's resin bed in short order. they are so important that I would spend the $1k for a new one whenever buying a house with well water. I'd probably also replace the softener for good measure.

in my current house the previous owners seriously neglected their water softener and had no iron filter. all plumbing fixtures/toilets/tubs/showers in the house were stained/trashed. in the process of gutting the house I replaced all plumbing fixtures, toilets, etc. replaced both water heaters. replaced the water softener. and installed an iron filter. our water is so clean & soft now its better than bottled water - with no RO filtration. tastes great. no staining in the toilets, etc. the iron filter backwashes every night. the softener regenerates after about 1200 gals.
 
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Old 06-16-15, 12:51 PM
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greystone –

I would think if your flow is good from the faucets in the home that would indicate it probably doesn’t have damage from sediment – at least that’s the way it seems to me. Plus since it doesn’t seem to have sand/silt now it would seem to me to be safe to assume it wasn’t any kind of long term problem in the past.

But what seems strange to me (but I admit my ignorance) is why there is a softener in place, though not in use, if the water is naturally soft. Was the softener truly not in use for the water test? I thought hardness was something that didn’t change very much over time. So why a softener in the house if the well water is naturally soft?

Just askin – maybe my assumption is wrong about hardness not significantly changing over time.
 
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