Ejector Pump/Pit Sewer Smell

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Old 10-06-15, 09:52 AM
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Ejector Pump/Pit Sewer Smell

I moved into a house that has a full basement bathroom and kitchen on the first floor. The kitchen sink drain pipe comes down into the basement and into the main sewer line. Since the fixtures in the basement bathroom drain below the main sewer line, we have an ejector pit/pump with drain and vent pipes coming out. Both the drain and vent pipe from the ejector pit connect to the drain line of the kitchen sink, which in turn connects to the main sewer line. The kitchen sink and the ejector pit are NOT connected to a vent stack.

Previously, any time the toilet was flushed in the basement, we would hear gurgling in the kitchen sink. Since there is no vent, I understand the ejector pit is trying to get air from somewhere.

Recently, during heavy rains and after not using the basement bathroom for 1-2 weeks, flushing the toiled caused a sewage smell to rise from the ejector pit. I sealed the lid with silicone. Now when the ejector pump runs, we hear gurgling in the kitchen, as well as the basement toilet and bathtub. I guess prior to sealing, the ejector pump was getting fresh air through openings in the lid.

The sewage smell has gone away, but I want to make sure the venting is done properly so we don't have issues in the future. Based on the building code, the ejector pump should have a vent running up to the roof. Is the only solution to separate the existing vent pipe and run it up to the roof (I don't have a nearby vent stack)? Can an air admittance valve be used? If I do that, is it okay to leave the kitchen sink without a vent? Any input would be greatly appreciated!
 
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Old 10-06-15, 11:18 AM
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I don't think a sewage ejector pit is a good application for an air admittance valve (AAV). They are basically just one way valves that let air enter but not leave. You need a vent that allows flow in both directions. As liquid enters the chamber it must "breathe" out and when pumping it must allow air to enter. So, it really needs a vent to the outside. A AAV would prevent the toilets and sink from gurgling when the pump runs but you'd still get burping & bubbling at a fixture when liquid enters the tank.
 
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Old 10-06-15, 11:54 AM
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Thank you Pilot Dane. Putting in a vent to the outside for the sewage ejector pit would stop the gurgling in the other fixtures? Should I connect the kitchen sink to the same vent or is okay to leave the kitchen sink without a vent?
 
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