Chemical Pump Relay Switch


  #1  
Old 12-30-15, 09:49 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Chemical Pump Relay Switch

Hello,

I am looking change my setup for my chemical injection pump from a flow switch currently installed in house to some sort of relay switch for the chemical pump to be installed at the well house (Approx: 500 ft from house).

I want to get rid of the flow switch since I have to clean it out about every month from the grit in my water. I even have a spin down trap filter and a 5 micron 10" filter before the flow switch and it is still getting clogged to the point that it will continue to run.

So I want to put the chemical pump down at the well house activated by the pressure switch. Now I have seen how to wire it inline with the pressure switch when it is activated to energize an outlet to run the pump.

To me that would seem to possibly overload the wire running the well pump and chemical pump at the same time? Maybe not, since that is how the manufacturer says to do it.

I am looking to do some sort of relay that would trigger the outlet on when the pressure switch kicks on.

Would anyone know of a way to do this. Cant seem to find what I am looking for on the web. maybe looking for wrong thing?
 
  #2  
Old 12-30-15, 09:53 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Now I have seen an AC power strip activated by a 12vdc trigger. $100+ seems a little high. Then I would need to have a ac to dc converter. Hopefully looking for something simpler
 
  #3  
Old 12-31-15, 08:05 AM
Z
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,338
Received 38 Votes on 37 Posts
Jeff-

To me that would seem to possibly overload the wire running the well pump and chemical pump at the same time? Maybe not, since that is how the manufacturer says to do it.
Iím no expert but I donít think the chemical pump adds very much amperage draw. In this example (under Specs) the draw is only 0.3 amps. I donít the answer to your real question, though, maybe someone will weigh in.

PULSAtron Series A Plus | Pulsafeeder SPO, Inc.
 
  #4  
Old 12-31-15, 11:53 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,828
Received 1,473 Votes on 1,361 Posts
The biggest problem is do you have a neutral at the pump house.
A typical well circuit would be two hot conductors for 240v with a ground wire and no neutral.
 
  #5  
Old 12-31-15, 06:41 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
"Iím no expert but I donít think the chemical pump adds very much amperage draw. In this example (under Specs) the draw is only 0.3 amps. I donít the answer to your real question, though, maybe someone will weigh in."

I would have to check specs on pump, probably not much.

"PJmax
The biggest problem is do you have a neutral at the pump house.
A typical well circuit would be two hot conductors for 240v with a ground wire and no neutral."

No there is no neutral as it is a 240v pump. Two hots and a ground.

Plus, my chem pump is 120v.

I have a outlet that is in the well house too. I was wondering if I could break the hot side tab, so that I could you use the top outlet for the pump and run a single wire from the pressure switch to the top outlet of the receptacle. The neutral and ground would already be present. Would this be legal?
 
  #6  
Old 12-31-15, 06:54 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sort of like a split receptacle. Just checking to see if I can run one 12 gauge wire from one of the well pump wires to the split receptacle to energize it when the pressure switch is activated. Since the outlet will have a neutral and ground already. Hope this makes sense
 
  #7  
Old 12-31-15, 08:04 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,828
Received 1,473 Votes on 1,361 Posts
It makes sense. Is it legal.... no. Is it safe...... not really.

You cannot use the neutral from one circuit and the hot from another.

I'd recommend using a 240v relay connected to the pressure switch to switch the 120v for your pump. A good relay to use would be one in the RIB line..... like the RIBH1C.

Functional-Devices-Enclosed-10-30VAC-208-277VAC/dp/B0041X175Y
 
  #8  
Old 12-31-15, 09:17 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
"PJmax
It makes sense. Is it legal.... no. Is it safe...... not really.

You cannot use the neutral from one circuit and the hot from another.

I'd recommend using a 240v relay connected to the pressure switch to switch the 120v for your pump. A good relay to use would be one in the RIB line..... like the RIBH1C.

Functional-Devices-Enclosed-10-30VAC-208-277VAC/dp/B0041X175Y"

Thanks for the info.

My biggest problem is reading wiring diagrams, would you know how to wire this unit to work with the setup I need? Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 12-31-15, 11:22 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,828
Received 1,473 Votes on 1,361 Posts
The relay mounts in a standard 1/2" KO in any electrical box. For example.....

Name:  RIB.jpg
Views: 460
Size:  15.2 KB


The wiring is fairly straightforward. The two X's are wires that get capped off.

Name:  RIBH1C.JPG
Views: 3445
Size:  34.4 KB
 
  #10  
Old 01-01-16, 05:12 PM
Z
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,338
Received 38 Votes on 37 Posts
  #11  
Old 01-01-16, 05:29 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,828
Received 1,473 Votes on 1,361 Posts
zoesdad..... not sure how helpful that link is.
 
  #12  
Old 01-02-16, 07:55 AM
Z
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,338
Received 38 Votes on 37 Posts
Well Iím no electrical guy for sure, so maybe the parallels I saw donít really exist (LOL):

. 110 chem pump but 220 well pump

.He was told he wouldnít have a neutral

. He was told he could bring a 110 circuit to the pump and use a relay (I thought it was like the one you show) connected to the 220

I thought the above was just an example of others giving the same advice you did. But Iím sure no electrical guy (LOL).
 
  #13  
Old 01-02-16, 08:02 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,828
Received 1,473 Votes on 1,361 Posts
The difference here is that this guy has a 120v circuit in his well house in addition to his 240v pump circuit. In this case... it makes the idea workable.
 
  #14  
Old 01-11-16, 06:35 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
"PJmax
The relay mounts in a standard 1/2" KO in any electrical box. For example.....

Attachment 60837


The wiring is fairly straightforward. The two X's are wires that get capped off.

Attachment 60838"

Thanks, I ordered one and will install this coming weekend. Will reply with results. Got it for $11. Better that spending $200+ for a new pump.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: