Replacing jet pump with submersible pump

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Old 08-23-16, 11:17 AM
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Replacing jet pump with submersible pump

I have a 40 foot deep 6 inch drilled well. Right now it has an old 3/4 horse jet pump. But the pump has been throwing off bits of metal into the discharge line and they are clogging up the foot valve. Everyone says if I need to replace the pump, to switch to a submersible. But I am concerned that with such a shallow well even the smallest pump will pump it dry. Someone said to get a restrictor valve to limit the flow, but I can't find one (do they have another name?). I also have to move the pipe to the house down 2 feet deeper while I am at it, and install a pitless adapter. Does everyone agree that a submersible is the way to go? Is there anything I am forgetting in my list of things to buy in order to do this?

New pump (the top one, the 1/2 horse 115V 2 wire)
new tank
torque arrestor
pitless adapter
copper wire
heat shrink wire splice kit
well cap
 
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Old 08-23-16, 01:26 PM
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Get a pressure switch with run dry protection (that is, if pressure falls below a threshold, it shuts everything down...cheapest option - I have that, although for me, my pump will never run dry...but it will shut off system if my mainline bursts). You can also get sensors you put in well that will accomplish the same thing (pricier). http://www.deanbennett.com/water-well-accessories.htm

Your have a pretty shallow well, so either option (jet or submersible) would be fine. Having pump above ground would be more appealing to me, since your well is so shallow. Don't forget check valves! Well guy suggested I put three in, but I just did two (one at pump, and one up top before pressure tanks). Of course, you'll need SS clamps 3 at each location. And brass insert fittings (pump, both sides of pitless) http://www.deanbennett.com/insert-brass-fittings.htm

You have a 'T' to connect pressure tank to line, gauge, pressure relief valve, spigot etc....
 
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Old 08-23-16, 01:50 PM
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Generally I would pick a submersible pump every time over a deep well jet pump. With a submersible you don't have trouble with the venturi clogging and they self prime. Deep well jet pumps can be annoying to prime but their foot valve assembly is small which allows you to get it closer to the bottom of your shallow well. Your well is shallow so a submersible pump will be short (relative) but still will probably be 2 1/2 feet tall.

If you do decide to go with a submersible pump I wouldn't use a torque arrestor on such a shallow well. In my area they aren't even considered unless the well is deeper than 200-300 feet.

Where are you located? Does your well casing already have a pitless adapter installed? If not you'll be in for a good bit of digging and work to install it. South of the Mason Dixon line it's common to run the piping out the top of the well riser/casing and insulate the piping to prevent freezing.
 
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Old 08-23-16, 02:17 PM
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No pitless, but I have to put one in regardless and move the pipe(s) two feet deeper since its only down half way to the frost line now. The digging is already done, it wasn't a big deal since the well is like 8 feet from the house. The only difference there is that the dual pipe pitless is $200, which eats up any savings I would get from going with a cheaper jet pump.

If I don't use a torque arrestor, then what is keeping the pump off the side of the well?

The pump has "run dry capability", but I am not sure what that means exactly. Just that it detects when it runs dry and shuts off? I just don't want the pump short cycling over and over as it draws all the water from the well too fast, then turns back on as the water level rises again and then immediately pumps it dry and shuts down again. Detecting that it pumped the well dry is just an emergency cover your ass thing, I want to prevent it from doing it in the first place too.
 
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Old 08-23-16, 04:28 PM
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Well man told me torque arresters are crap...apparently they grab the wiring and whatnot and make a mess.
Now, for a 40ft well, that is debatable.
I have poly pipe (flexible - came in a roll)...if your using straight pipe, less likely to have torque issues.
I did use cable guards - 5ft, 15ft then one near top...or maybe at 40ft or so...my memory eludes me. Plus, I had a trick shroud unit over pump so it would draw water from below cooling pump and limit sand ingestion from above.
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/we...ml#post2331739

http://www.deanbennett.com/misc-well-accessories.htm

What model of pump were you considering that had run dry protection?
I know some pumps have thermal protection, but maybe the new Grundfos jobs have run dry protection...
 
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