How to shock the well


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Old 11-02-16, 04:54 AM
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How to shock the well

I posted on here previously about well tank problems. got that fixed. now I had the water tested and it shows bacteria. county said from all the work done and the new pressure tank install. can anyone tell the best way to shock the water system. what I am seeing is to pour a diluted bleach and water solution in to the well casing. is this the proper way. I have the pump suspended on the end of the pipe attached to a 1/4 inch nylon rope as an additional safety measure. will the bleach deteriorate the rope? can anyone point me to the proper procedure or post it on here?

frank
 
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Old 11-02-16, 05:35 AM
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What kind of bacteria was found ?

If it was E. Coli (Escherichia coli), that only originates in the GI tract of mammals, and is seldom found in a deep drilled well.

As a Real Estate Broker, I've been involved in sanitizing a few hundred wells after some kind of coliform bacteria was found; but it was most often the interior piping and faucets/strainers/washers/swivels which harbored the bacteria . . . . not the originating well itself.

Still, to sanitize the potable water supply of a house, you do have to start with the well, and it's best to estimate the amount of water inside the stand pipe before adding chlorine/bleach so that you don't over do it. I once had a Seller dump a swimming pool shock treatment into his well and it took a week to get a water sample that ran free of chlorine.

I think a quart of chlorine per 100 gallons of water is about maximum, and before doing anything, you want to make sure that all occupants are informed to avoid drinking any of the treated water until the chlorine bleach has completely dissipated . . . . besides, most laboratories will reject any sample still containing any trace of bleach.

You needn't dilute the bleach in advance because it will automatically be diluted upon being poured into the well water. I doubt that it will have any effect on your rope; but to be sure, you might get a sample and saturate it with bleach to be sure it doesn't rapidly deteriorate; a rinse with clear water would be useful to insure that the rope isn't subjected to bleach for any longer than the quick (careful) pour.

After adding my bleach to a well, I would return to the living quarters and turn on each faucet until I could smell the presence of bleach, and then go on to the next. Though not always necessary, , I would leave the entire system chlorinated over night; and then draw my sample the next day.

I never draw a sample from a faucet equipped with a swivel because it seems that they can NEVER be sanitized, nor can a shower faucet. And I would always remove the strainer and rubber gasket from the faucet chosen to serve as the source of the sample.

Samples are drawn after completely flushing the system of all chlorine. . . . and then faucets can be re-assembled and the occupants given the "all-clear" to once again drink the water.

Most States tolerate one or two parts per million total coliform bacteria; but most Public Health Department standards tolerate NO E.Coli.

That's just the suggestion of a Broker; NOT a profession hydrologist or chemical bacteriologist.
 
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Old 11-02-16, 05:41 AM
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Bleach will not hurt the safety rope for your submersible pump.

Do you know the depth of your well? There is a data plate on many wells and if not your county Health or Environmental Services Dept should have a record of your well. With that information you can calculate/estimate the amount of water in the well to know how much chlorine bleach to add.

Add the chlorine to the well. Then it's best to get a garden hose hooked to a spigot on the house and run the hose back to the well. Then run the hose back into the well until you smell chlorine. This helps mix and distribute the chlorine in the well and pipe to the house, and it's the one step of the process I never do. Then run each faucet in the house until you smell chlorine. Then let the well sit unused for as long as possible.
 
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Old 11-02-16, 11:25 AM
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the well is 180 ft. deep and it has 150 feet in water to the bottom of the pump. the casing is 6 inches dia. the water is about 50 feet down in the well. how much bleach do you think? undiluted is the best way to go? let me know how much you think or any ideas. I am estimating about a gallon of bleach.
 
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Old 11-02-16, 11:38 AM
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Here is a .pdf with instructions.
 
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Old 11-02-16, 03:10 PM
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One additional step that I perform if the home is on a private Waste Water Disposal System . . . . is to revisit after a week or two, and put a cup of Rid-X down the drain to help re-populate the colony of beneficial bacteria in the Septic Tank or Cesspool.

All of that bleach going down the Well ultimately winds up in the Septic Tank where it kills off a lot of the good bacteria who are needed to break down human waste. Most people skip this step; but especially with small households, I don't just leave it up to nature . . . . and I've never had to pay for pumping someone else's Septic Tank.
 
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Old 11-02-16, 03:14 PM
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IMO a packet of yeast is just as effective and a lot cheaper.
 
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Old 11-03-16, 05:45 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr
IMO a packet of yeast is just as effective and a lot cheaper
Yes; but I've never tried baking bread with Rid-X. It might address that age old issue of having a batch of dough that falls because it hasn't been kept warm enough (75F +/- 5 ?).

I'm always concerned that Real Estate Customers might think I'm cutting corners (publicly), so I always like to use the Brand Name product when others often use this to make judgments about me . . . . as vain and unfortunate as that is. When dealing with Septic issues, I try to stay top-notch all the way.

Now here in Vermont, the contents of our Septic Tanks are often subjected to temperatures below 40F and Rid-X contains a broad spectrum of active agents (Bacteria Cultures, Enzymes, and Micronutrients in a flavorful Wheat Bran Carrier), many of whom can tolerate these "lower-than-bread-dough" temperatures deep down inside the Tank.

But I digress.

I'll try making a Loaf of Bread using Rid-X in lieu of yeast; but don't tell anyone !
 
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Old 11-03-16, 05:48 AM
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I'll pass on that homemade bread
My grandfather in Michigan always put a packet of yeast in his septic tank every month and never had any issues. I do the same but forget about half of the time
 
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Old 11-09-16, 04:49 AM
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I shocked the well and against your suggestions I used two gallon of bleach and now have to wait until the bleach gets cleaned out of the water supply. good things well water tested good for bacteria and nitrates. bad things, more is not always better. thanks

frank
 
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Old 11-09-16, 07:05 AM
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A friend of mine is a driller. He uses Chlorine pool shock dissolved in 5 gallons of water. He then runs a hose from an outside outlet to the well and runs the water into the well until he smells Chlorine. Because we have a lot of iron algae. He then overfills the well so the water pressure from the excess water pushes the chlorine into the shale rock. Besides removing the extra algae it also increases the water recharge into the well.
 
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Old 11-09-16, 05:54 PM
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now have to wait until the bleach gets cleaned out of the water supply
Just run a garden hose until the chlorine is no longer detected. Could take quite a few hours.
 
 

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