Sump pit issues


  #1  
Old 02-20-17, 05:10 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: United States
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sump pit issues

I am having a sump pit issue that I need help with. My sump pump seems to have died quite a while ago and I was unaware. I happened to notice when I saw the pit was full of mud. I cleaned out the pit and bought a new pump. I have not installed the new pump yet because I needed to find a pipe adapter to connect it. By the time I'd gotten the right part the pit has filled up with mud again. It took me a while to get the part and there was a lot of rain during those couple weeks. Any thoughts as to where the mud is coming from and how to fix that? I don't want to install a new pump just to let it get overwhelmed with debris. Do you guys need pictures? What pictures do you need?
 
  #2  
Old 02-20-17, 06:10 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 62,529
Received 1,596 Votes on 1,471 Posts
It would seem that you have water but haven't had the need to actually pump it out.
I'm guessing the pit did not overflow ?

When you cleaned the pit out what did you see ?
A plastic lined pit ?
An old stone pit ?
Underground lines coming into the pit ?

It's hard to stop the mud without knowing where it's coming from.
 
  #3  
Old 02-21-17, 04:21 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: United States
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for responding

The pit itself did not overflow. There is a drain next to the pit that the utility sink (which the washing machine empties into) hooks up to that was overflowing. I was trying to clean out that drain when I noticed the pit. I'm still a relatively new homeowner in the sense I'm just now learning how to maintain a lot of the house. I don't believe I saw a liner in the pit but I think I did see a pipe running out underground in the direction of my garage/back yard. It's an old house built in 1941 so I'm not sure what's been updated and what hasn't. I haven't seen signs of overflow in the back yard, but part of my sidewalk and city curb have collapsed. Could this have something to do with the issue? How do I tell? I can clear out the pit again and provide whatever pictures you need.
 
  #4  
Old 02-21-17, 10:18 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,500
Received 137 Votes on 126 Posts
How far is the pit from the collapsed part of the sidewalk?

You need to fix things so water does not collect around your house foundation. Any mini-sinkhole around your foundation need to be filled with clay based dirt or soil. Remove any depressed gravel or mulch areas around your foundation and pack in clay based soil in their place, enough to slope away from the house.

A pit that repeatedly refills with mud could mean that the earth (soil) somewhere is collapsing and, little by little, is being carried through ever widening channels to your pit as rain water finds its way down.
.
 
  #5  
Old 02-21-17, 06:23 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: United States
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Gotcha. The sidewalk where the collapse is isn't anywhere near the foundation of the house. It's on the corner of the curb just touching the sidewalk near the very end of my driveway. There aren't any signs of collapse up against the house. The gutters where they drain water on the ground were messed up, but my dad fixed those. I'm on a corner so the wind hits my house just right to knock around the gutter spouts. But I have not seen any collapsed areas directly near the perimeter of the house.
 
  #6  
Old 03-10-17, 06:55 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: United States
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I think I may have found the culprit! I'm sorry it took so long!

So I walked around my house looking for anything suspicious in relation to where the sump pit would be below ground. I found a teenage tree growing right up against the house. I think my crab apple created a clone because the bark looks similar. It's about the size of a big bush at this point so it's not a baby but it's not massive either. Right next to the "tree" the gutter down spout seems to have come apart so that any water is going directly down as opposed to being led away from the house. I moved the leaves over and there appeared to be an odor. The soil is very soft in my yard so there doesn't appear to be a hole but the odor tells me something is going on there. Once I found it I propped up the detached gutter part to the down spout with some spare bricks temporarily. I also noticed the grass on that particular side of my back yard is brown in a triangular pattern. We noticed the grass back in 2008 when I bought the house but didn't think too much about it. Now though, with the current problem, I'm wondering if it's connected.
 
Attached Images    
  #7  
Old 03-10-17, 08:00 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,500
Received 137 Votes on 126 Posts
(copied from another forum) When you make a change to fix a problem with a drainage system or a sump pump, allow a week's time to see whether any improvement took place.
 
  #8  
Old 03-11-17, 03:51 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 7,497
Received 530 Votes on 490 Posts
Plausible that water (and dirt) from the downspout was going into the sump. I'm sure you have concluded that needs to be repaired first. Getting water away, far away, from the house is critical.

Id get that tree out of there, that is a potential foundation problem growing there.

Also if you're going to invest in a new sump, dont buy the krappy units they sell at BB stores, I've learned the hard way you get exactly what you pay for.

Wayne and Liberty are the best!
 
  #9  
Old 03-11-17, 03:34 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: United States
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you both for responding! Great tips! The new sump pump is already bought. If the askew down spout is what's pushing dirt into my sump pit, should it be assumed there's already pipe or tile grid damage allowing that soil entry? If I dig down, what am I looking for? When I remove the tree, are there any precautions I need to take considering the proximity to the house? And should I be acquiring a plumbing permit if I'm digging down in my yard to look for damage to the discharge pipe and/or the tile grid?
 
  #10  
Old 03-11-17, 04:10 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,500
Received 137 Votes on 126 Posts
You can probably get away without a permit while excavating in your yard.

The downspout should not be emptying into the drain tile grid near the house but rather the downspout water should flow or be carried away from the house.

If you reach the drain tiles, check and redo if needed so kinks or undulations are replaced with a straight run and any mud you catch inside is cleaned out.
 
  #11  
Old 03-11-17, 05:20 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 7,497
Received 530 Votes on 490 Posts
When I remove the tree, are there any precautions I need to take considering the proximity to the house? And should I be acquiring a plumbing permit if I'm digging down in my yard
Just cut the tree off at the base, nothing else needed. Permits are essentially needed for improvements, not maintenance, just get that elbow on the down spout fixed then see if your mud situation improves.
 
  #12  
Old 03-11-17, 06:57 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: United States
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Will do. I'll let you know if I have any more questions!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: