Basement flooded and sump pump problems

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Old 02-22-17, 04:03 PM
J
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Basement flooded and sump pump problems

Hello,

Thank you in advance for any help you can provide.

A few weeks ago I went into my basement and discovered an overflowing sump pit and seepage from three walls at the cove joint. After some looking around, I discovered that the sump pump had failed. I replaced the pump, the water left the pit, and the seepage receded. However, I noticed that there was an alarming (to me) amount of water coming in to the pit through the "inlet" pipe. It has to be about 5 gallons per minute and the pump cycles every minute. I forgot to mention that this all occurred when there was no rain or large snow melt. I am scared to see what happens when it rains heavily. Do any of you have any ideas of why that much water can be pouring in?

Also, I had us waterproofing come out and he simply suggested making the pit larger and installing a battery backup. However, he seemed pretty nonchalant about it which kind of annoyed me. Also, instead of simply in lashing the pit and pumping all of that water out, I think I would rather adress why that much water is coming in.

Any thoughts?
 
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Old 02-22-17, 04:42 PM
C
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Do you still (several weeks later) have that much water flowing into the sump, or did it taper off after a few days? When you pump failed, all your foundation drains and the gravel and soil under your slab and next to your foundation got saturated with water, and it can take quite a while to drain it all out.

But if it is still flowing that fast without a lot of rain or snow melt, and it didn't use to flow that much, it could be a leaking water pipe outside the foundation. Do you have a well or municipal water?
 
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Old 02-22-17, 04:45 PM
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Water coming into a basement is almost always best addressed on the outside. Is your home graded to get all surface and downspout water at least 10 feet away from the house and flowing (not pooling) away from the house? Does your basement have a perimeter drain system? If so is it clogged or is it open and flowing freely?
 
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Old 02-22-17, 07:57 PM
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Pilot Dane,

Thanks for the response.

This occurred when there was no rain. So I do not believe it is a downspout issue. However, I have extended all downspouts ten feet away from the house.

As far as the grade and the perimeter drain system, I do not know. I bought this house last September and this is the first time that I have owned anything aside from a town house. How do I determine if the grade is acceptable? How do I determine if there is a perimeter drain systemy? If there is a perimeter drain, how can I tell if it is clogged?

If the permit error drain does exist, and is clogged, wouldn't that slow the flow of water into my sump pit? Right now there is a constant flow of water into the pit itself.
 
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Old 02-22-17, 08:16 PM
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Look around.... try to picture where water could be coming from.
A pond next door. A river or stream nearby. Anything like that ?

Are you in a lower area than other houses around you ?
Have you checked with neighbors to see if they have a similar issue ?
 
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Old 02-23-17, 05:31 AM
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It's very simple. Water flows downhill. Look around your house and see how water would flow away from your house. If you direct your gutters 10 feet away but it forms a puddle there or the ground is flat so the water doesn't move away quickly where does the water go? The longer it stays the more water will soak into the ground... and your basement is nearby and low so the water will go there.

Water is always present underground. That partially why wells work. So, water coming into your basement even though it hasn't rained isn't much a surprise. It does make me think you're really going to get water when you get some heavy rains.

A perimeter drain works by providing a path of least resistance for the water to get away from your basement. If the drain is nonexistent or clogged the water will find it's way into your basement. If the property doesn't have enough elevation drop for the drain to exit to daylight the perimeter drain will empty into the sump pit so the water can be pumped up and away. In that case the drain and sump are artificially lowering the local water table around your house/basement. If water goes into the ground faster than your system can remove it then you'll likely get water in the basement. If you can drain it away and pump it out faster than it comes in then your basement will be relatively dry.
 
 

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