Ejector Pit TOO pressurized?

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Old 03-18-17, 07:42 PM
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Ejector Pit TOO pressurized?

Hey everyone,
Just finished my basement bathroom and the sewage pump is in along with the toilet (not done with sink yet). However, here is my situation:
1) Pump cycles appropriately
2) I can hear fluid being ejected
3) I hear a loud thud and then hear water running back into the pit
4) Smalll amount of fluid seems to be forced out around seal of discharge pipe and cover
5) For a while I can hear a slight hissing from the quick disconnect fittings on the discharge pipe

SO... i unbolted the cover and raised it up a bit so I could see the pump and flushed the toilet a few times to activate the cycle and the pump functioned perfectly (none of symptoms above)?

I am using a flapper style sewage ejector check valve (from THD) and a .6HP pump, raising the waste about 10 feet to my main drain line.

What could be causing what seems like the lack of "venting"? (I have a 2" vent)

THANKS!!
 
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Old 03-18-17, 07:49 PM
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Can you post a few pictures of your setup there ? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

The pit should not be under any pressure.
 
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Old 03-18-17, 07:55 PM
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I will PJ... however it is a pretty vanilla/standard setup.
2" drain pipe running out of pit and connecting into 3" main drain. 2" vent pipe running out of pit into ceiling above.

I say "pressurized" only because of the hissing sound and slight fluid coming from seal of drain pipe around cover...
 
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Old 03-19-17, 04:35 AM
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Here is the general setup...
The check valve is an Everbuilt 2" sewage check valve flapper style.
 
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Old 03-19-17, 05:06 AM
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Where does the vent line run? Have you confirmed that it's connected to a vent and not capped off?
 
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Old 03-19-17, 05:17 AM
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Thanks for the replies guys!
Pilot Dane, great point but the vent line and all the rough in was already here and done when the house was built. I guess I just assumed it connected to the main vent lines and out through the roof... (You know what happens when you assume!)

How would I check and make sure this vent line is not capped off? Any tricks?
 
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Old 03-19-17, 09:12 AM
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Does the vent go straight up or thru the basement to another location ?

You could use the air out of a vacuum cleaner. Hold the pipe inside the vent line. Try to seal it with your hand. There should be no pressure buildup.

If the vent line goes straight up thru the floor.... are there any plumbing fixtures over that location on the floors above ?

If there are no fixtures over that area... that line may dead end in the attic.
 
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Old 03-19-17, 09:48 AM
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It goes straight up to the ceiling, no fixtures directly above... I will do the vacuum cleaner test, thats a great idea!

Back with the results later today...
 
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Old 03-19-17, 10:01 AM
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Since there are no fixtures above it.... it may be capped off in the attic.
 
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Old 03-19-17, 11:58 AM
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Do you know if the existing vent line had to be cut to install the new vent or was there a stub out existing for the ejector pit? If there was already a stub out it likely was capped. There are caps that glue inside the pipe so it's possible that the new vent line was attached with the cap still in place.

I would disconnect the vent line at the union fitting and try the vacuum cleaner. You can also try holing a smoking cigarette or blown out match (making smoke) at the vent to check for a draft.
 
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Old 03-19-17, 03:15 PM
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The vent line was stubbed out (and capped off) directly above the pit. I cut the cap which was glued on the outside when I ran it the rest of the way down to the pit...

I hooked my shop vac to the vent line at the disconnect union as suggested... Did not really notice any draw on the vacuum? I will try the smoke test...

The wet vent from the vanity is tied into the sewage pit vent at ceiling height per code so I had to tape that opening off as I have not finished putting the sink together yet.

Is it possibly somehow the check valve? It is definitely the valve making the thud sound when it activates?
 
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Old 03-19-17, 04:12 PM
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Guys... So the vent line is definitely clear, just checked it again. I actually left the vent line quick disconnect unhooked and flushed the toilet a few times and it produced the same result. Thud and a small amount of fluid forced out around the gasket of the drainage pipe and cover, etc... What about the drainage line could produce these symptoms? Thanks SO much...
 
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Old 03-19-17, 04:34 PM
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The thud is the sound of the check valve closing and is normal.

I'm trying to understand how liquid could be getting up to that gasket. The sump should only be partially filled. There should be plenty of air between the top of the liquid and the top of the tank.

When the pump runs it draws a vacuum in the pit and the vent line allows air into the pt.
 
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Old 03-19-17, 07:02 PM
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PJ, I do know the water level does not get abnormally high, and indeed their is plenty of air space. I have not caulked around the gaskets or the cover itself, but plan to... would this have an effect on the leakage? It seems to come out pretty quickly, but again is only a smalll amount.

Perhaps the water spraying out of the weep hole is splashing/spraying up to much off the sides toward the top? I drilled it straight in so I know it is not angled up, but in hind sight good have angled it down...

This help the investigation any? Again, really appreciate the help here...
 
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Old 03-20-17, 05:58 AM
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Many ejector pumps have a siphon break hole drilled in the output piping. When the pump runs a pencil sized stream of poo juice is squirted out. You can sometimes hear this and it sounds like someone spraying a garden hose inside the ejector pit. Maybe your hole is aimed so the water is splashing up on the seal area. If so then a deflector inside the pit could help.
 
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Old 03-20-17, 06:52 AM
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Weep Hole deflector?

Yes Pilot Dane, I drilled this 3/16" siphon break hole as the pump manual recommended and the fluid comes straight out the side (perhaps could have angled the hole down in hindsight).

So now what is the best way to fabricate and install this deflector?

Should it actually try and direct the fluid down and/or should there just be a "splash guard" to keep fluid from splashing off the side of the pit onto the seals? (not sure that is actually happening but seems logical).
 
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Old 03-20-17, 12:28 PM
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I would use a scrap piece of PVC pipe. Slit it lengthwise and with a oven or heat gun heat the PVC until it softens and form it to the shape of a deflector, leaving a tab on the top so you can mount it to your pipe with a all stainless steel hose clamp.
 
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Old 03-20-17, 12:43 PM
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Good idea! I will try that Pilot Dane and report back here on the results...
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