Sump drain advice needed


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Old 08-06-17, 11:23 AM
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Sump drain advice needed

I am looking to purchase a single family home.
They have a black hose coming out from the side of the house at the foundation just below the siding. its the sump drain. it drains into the yard.
The current owner purchased it as a foreclosure and has it 70% updated inside with new furnace, hot water heater, appliances, carpet and so on.

The basement had been finished with a full bath, but experienced a flood and the current owner gutted the basement back down to the studs.

the property is in a lower area as is the whole neighborhood which did experience a flood in 1996. Since then the city reworked the drainage system and added a large retention pond. a 2014 analysis shows the home is not in a flood hazard area and the FEMA flood map shows the water does not reach the property.

When i saw the property there had been a rain and it was discharging a constant flow of water and the sump pump was running continuously.

The owner has had two previous buyers walk away after home inspection. it has been radon tested and passed.

I think the homes original buried sump drain must have failed the owners at that time gerry rigged it with the hose rather pay a sewer contractor to fix it properly.

I will have a contractor look at it for his opinion and naturally schedule a home inspection but curious what you all think.

If I pay to have it re trenched and properly draining away from the house it should be fine correct? I can also add two sump pumps wired in vs a battery backup even add a generator if I choose to refinish the basement to protect that investment.

it has scared away the other buyer who didn't want to figure out the issue but the home has alot of potential and the only out of 30 my wife and I liked. fantastic neighborhood this home is the worst on the block, a little design and TLC it could be the best on the block.

Whats your opinion on this. Thanks
 
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Old 08-06-17, 11:37 AM
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Some buyers will refuse to buy any house that needs a sump pump for any significant portion of the year (or at all).

Properly grading the surface will usually not avoid the need for a sump pump. Meanwhile, less than optimum grading will result in a added running time for a sump pump.

The only way to avoid a sump pump when there is ground water above basement floor level is to have a plot of land that has some downhill portion where a pipe can be run from thw sump pump pit continuously gently downhill and the pipe will emerge from the ground. Then no pump has to be installed in the pit.
 
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Old 08-10-17, 07:11 AM
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i was able to take some photos at the recent inspection. in the one photo not sure if that is a drain? but i circled in red where you can see there is a void between the concrete and pipe with standing water.
in the other picture you can see where they ripped up the concrete floor and re-poured. it appear they put in a new drain and what a clean out? notice the wet line along the new pour? the inspector said it appears water is pushing up through that crack.

do these things look repairable by a professional plumber or should i walk away?

Also I should add while i was observing the sump pit, it only takes 10 minutes for it fill and turn the pump on. why so much water? busted pipe possibly under the foundation? it has not rained here in 4 days.??? i think this foundation has a major water issue.

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Old 08-10-17, 04:11 PM
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There are lots of variables that make answering your quesitons very complicated.

Therefore I suggest you pass up this house.

It will take expertise to figure out how much it will cost to control the water. (Ground water cannot be eliminated completely; you have to just get rid of it faster than it comes in.)

You can have a quick analysis done for not too much money and end up with a wide spread of how much it will cost. Then you will and I recommend making a low offer that takes into account the worst case.l

Or you can have a comprehensive analysis done for somewhat more money allowing you to make a more precise offer. But if you and the seller still don't get to an agreeable price you are out the money spent on the analysis.

Leave this house for someone who already has the expertise to do the analysis without spending too much money to hire experts.

By the way, if this lot is one of the lowest in the neighborhood, one more strong reason not to make an offer.
 
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Old 08-10-17, 05:35 PM
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Therefore I suggest you pass up this house.
Sorry, the OP is looking for advice but to be honest we can only speculate what is truly going on and provide suggestions and a advice based on our prior experiences.

To suggest our opinions are sufficient to make or break a house purchase is completely arrogant and not something I would ever attempt to provide.

You have something going on, if the house is sound anything can be fixed and the sales price should reflect.

Find a good plumber, there are a lot of independent guys out there and for a couple hours pay will tell you exactly what is going on and what is needed to resolve.

Information is power!!!!
 
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Old 08-12-17, 05:25 AM
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Allan & the rest of you thank you for your replies. I decided to pass.
The current owner purchased the home for $155,000 at auction as a foreclosure. He is selling at $239,000 so he has plenty of profit to hire professionals to tell him the problem and correct it. He is a home owner novice flipper. Everything he has done was sub par except the install of the new furnace and hot water heater because i hired those out.

Other problems aside once totally repaired I believe due to the lot and grade and location this home will always have a running sump pump. If someone wants to invest in finishing the basement again the smartest move is to drop $5k on a generac home stand by generator for total protection.

I am going to save my money for a home thats already on par.
thanks.
 
 

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