Artesian well spring in basement, backup pump ideas in power outage?


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Old 11-08-17, 02:51 PM
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Artesian well spring in basement, backup pump ideas in power outage?

Any ideas on very inexpensive backup power for sump pumps, or alternative pumping options that don't need electric? We do not have city water so a water pressure pump wouldn't work.
We have a very old house in upstate NY with an unusual water source, it is a hand dug well 3'3'x4' or 5' deep inside the basement that is spring fed. Overall it works out ok, but the inflow exceeds the outflow (i guess the water table has risen since it was dug 100+ years ago). We constantly pump water out of it with 2 sumps going out to our pond, one of them siphons continualy through a 1" pipe and only turns on the pump when the other one can't keep up. We also have a backup sump on the floor for when the foundation leaks in heavy rain... I know it's crazy that much water is coming into our basement.. But there isn't much to be done about that at this point... we just have to get it back out.
When we have had power outages we end up with a foot of water in the basement!
It's like a terrible underground cave swimming pool!!!
Ideas much appreciated!
 
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Old 11-08-17, 03:13 PM
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Had a house years ago that every spring the water table would rise and pump would run all the time, then after a couple months would go dry.

Had a power outage one year and luckly the local rental place had a gas powered pump that saved the basement from getting soaked.

I debated buying one but since they had a couple on hand I held back and never had an opportunity to need one.

I looked into other options but being on a well, the only options I could come up with was the gas powered pump or a generator and pump.
 
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Old 11-08-17, 06:11 PM
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As long as the "well" is below where you want the water to go..... you'll need some type of power to move it. A generator or gas pump. I'd opt for a generator as it can be used to run other things.
 
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Old 11-09-17, 03:05 PM
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Marq1, I never thought to check out rental places, maybe a good option since us keeping a rarely used item in working order seems realistically iffy, Lol!
A gas pump may work as they seem quite inexpensive, especially the trash pups I saw online since we could easily move that around and pump water in the event of our creek flooding our yard again.

Pjmax, A generator would be a good option too, I may be able to convince others in the house to spend a little more on a generator since we could hook up the heater too.
I'll have to look into what would be needed to run a sump and our forced air oil furnace, or a sump and an electric space heater.
thanks guys!
 
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Old 11-09-17, 03:13 PM
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Something in the 3500-5000w range would be fine.

Most electric heaters use around 1500w and the pump should be around 750-1000w.
 
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Old 11-09-17, 03:17 PM
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Cool, I'll have to check those out.
do you know of any small battery pumps that would start off a siphon? We have plenty of drop outside behind our house but getting the siphon started has proved challenging, especially in the winter here when everything freezes up if it isn't flowing fast enough.
 
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Old 11-10-17, 06:26 AM
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Question: I assume you don't see a gravity solution where a buried drain line could simply get rid of the water to a lower location. Reason I ask is you mentioned a pond which would be somewhat controlled bu the natural water table. I have had to deal with two homes where the water they pumped out was contributing to the water flowing back in. How high is the surface of that pond in relation to the floor of your basement? Was the pond man made or something mother nature donated to the landscape?

Bud
 
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Old 11-10-17, 11:14 AM
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Hi Bud9051, we have about a 15+ foot drop to the pond from the house and it's a good 100+ feet away, it was a man made pond where it appears they dug into the swamp and piled the diggings into an earthen dam about 6' high. A good size creek runs just beyond that swamp. We also have a creek about 20-30 feet from our house that used to be at a few feet Below the level of our basement floor but in the last 10 years our area has seen some floods that have brought massive amounts of rocks from the hills and filled in all the creeks! Now the creek level is probably 3 feet Above the basement floor!! And thats after spending thousands to get it dug out only to fill in again the next year... It's a lose lose situation!

Ideally it would be great to have a drain dug at the propper level out of the basement to just allow water to drain off naturally, unfortunately that's beyond our ability to afford :-( It would have to be an 8 foot deep trench 50-75 feet long with drain pipe installed... I wish we could do this though.

The water is insane around here, One time we removed some original wood posts for built in shelving in the basement and broke a hole in the concrete floor, water came bubbling up crystal clear and ice cold! So we never have to worry during droughts :-/ it was a separet spring from the one in the dug well.
Our neighbors all have problems similar to these. Terrible location now a 100 years after the area was orriginaly built up.
 
 

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