Check Valve Question


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Old 06-11-18, 10:20 AM
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Check Valve Question

OK. So I have a cottage that draws its water from the river. I have a 1/2Hp jet pump in the cottage and a poly line that goes through my crawlspace, then underground out into the water with a foot valve at the end, held above the river bottom by placing it in a plastic recycle bin that is held down to the bottom by cinder blocks inside it (poly pipe goes through holes cut at the top of the recycle bin). Foot valve is probably 5 feet below the water surface and maybe 15 inches above the bottom.

Every now and then I get a small leak in the poly pipe. It has happened maybe 3 times in about 15 years. Probably a neighbor hitting hit with a fish hook or maybe a muskrat taking a bite out of it, who knows.

Not a large leak but maybe 1/2 gallon per hour of water loss. It is quite a pain going out in the water in my tin boat and pulling up that recycle bin. It is full of lake water and although it has holes it would take too long for that to drain. With the water in it and the cinder blocks, it must be close to 200 lbs when above the water and hence I drag it over to my dock to work on it.

Anyway, fixing these leaks is growing old quickly and I was thinking about adding a check valve in front of my pump. My question is, once the check valve is in position, in front of the intake of my jet pump, how would I prime the line? I usually add water to the top of the pump for prime, but the check valve would prevent it from flowing in that direction. Has anyone dealt with this issue or is it an issue at all?
 
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Old 06-11-18, 02:37 PM
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If you install a check valve in the water inlet line from the lake you prime your pump the same as usual. The check valve will just prevent water from draining back down into the lake when the pump is off. Pay attention to the system if you do install the check valve. Pumps like having a nice free flow on their inlet side especially when sucking water uphill. Restricting the water flow on the output side of the pump rarely causes problems but you may notice a performance drop with the resistance on the inlet side especially if you are close to the limits for the pump.
 
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Old 06-12-18, 04:48 AM
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I am just concerned that if I lose some water in the water line to the river, either while I am installing the check valve or for any reason after, how would I add water in that line if I have a check valve between the line and where I add water to the pump.

Do people add a tee with a cap on it so they can add more water to the line if necessary or is it rarely ever necessary. I never had a check valve on my jet pump before and it was a problem that occured to me.
 
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Old 06-12-18, 08:50 AM
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If you want you can add a fitting with a cap on the lake side of your new check valve so you can fill the pipe.
 
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Old 06-12-18, 09:23 AM
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OK. Thanks. I probably will.

I have one additional issue in that I need to winterize this cottage for the frigid months and I have a Y, with a cap on it, in the poly line just below the floor where the pump is. If I have a fitting with a cap I can remove it and vent the water just on the other side of the check valve and allow it to flow out the Y, and then refill it with water in the spring.

Thanks for your help.
 
 

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