Trying To Shock My Well.


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Old 06-30-18, 10:39 PM
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Trying To Shock My Well.

Im wanting to shock my well and don't want to screw anything up. I'm fairly mechanically adept but also fine with asking when I'm new to something.

This is my first house with a well and I want to do a maintenance treatment but I don't have the nice, simple, flip top well access that everyone else seems to have.

So, after looking at the pic of my well head, what I want to know is, what's the rope for? It it attached to the pump? I'm assuming that I need to shut off the power and disconnect the suction pipe at the gray connection? Is the seal plate holding my pump and so do I run the risk of losing my pump down the well if I completely removed it add not tie off or clamp the pipework?

I want to do a shock as the cold water is a little smelly and the hot is very smelly. I'm currently using 2 inline, 5 micron carbon canister filters before a softener with iron fighter salt in it. The salt has taken care of my rusty water and the 3 month filters take care of the smell for about 3 to 4 weeks then I have to change them. I also hit the water heater with peroxide every couple of weeks.

The water smelled real bad when we moved in, even though the seller had the well shocked before we moved in (he had to to pass the water tests for our mortgage). I did some reading up and changed the old sediment fillers out for the carbon ones and put peroxide in the water heater (also run it through the water pipes and let it sit for 8 to 10 hours) and fitted an electric anode.

Things seamed fixed for a few months then the water started smelling again. Changed the filters and put peroxide in the water heater again but it didn't last as long this time. Now we know that when the water starts smelling, the filters are done.

If I have to change the filters every month, then I will but I'd rather know how to get into my well, shock it then do a maintenance treatment every nite and then.

Sorry if this rambles a bit, it's late/early and i'm tired. Any help is much appreciated. Link to pic is below if it isn't correctly showing.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/165504273@N02/w22ip9
 
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Old 07-01-18, 02:46 AM
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Anyone ever suggest that you have Sulphur Water . . . . water drawn from an aquifer containing decaying buried organic matter from prehistoric times (like before the glacial periods). Reading up on the geological history of your specific territory can provide a lot of insight. I've had people solve the problem by re-drilling their well to extend the depth a few hundred feet and place their suction draw at that lower level in the stratified aquifer; but not always.

When that's the source, shocking can only deal with the small amount of water already inside the well casing,(and the bacteria that may be in it) and your home's distribution system . . . . not the source of the water.

Check with your neighbors to see how deep their wells are and see if they also have this issue, and whether they've overcome the problem, or just learned to live with it. Shocking the well in these instances can only provide a short term alleviation; and sometimes, none at all.
 
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Old 07-01-18, 06:55 AM
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As far as the hot water goes, whens the last time the anode rod was changed?
I'd replace it with a Magnesium one.
 
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Old 07-01-18, 10:57 AM
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I never considered sulpher water but I know that the water here is high in iron (and so with it iron bacteria).

My anode was completely eroded away when I fitted my electric anode (mentioned in my original post). My friend, a mile down the road, fitted an aluminum/zinc anode and he said his smelly water went away. I am considering fitting one of these myself to see if it works but from everything I've read, the electric anode should have done what the aluminum/zinc one does.

Many people around here just pay for Culligan systems but I'm enjoying not paying a monthly service fee for my water. What I'm paying in filters and peroxide is no where near what a Culligan system week cost per month.

I've read in a few places that one big shock of peroxide (run through the system and soak like bleach) and then a maintenance dose every now and then can keep a well fairly fresh without the huge hastle of using chlorine bleach every time. This is what I want to do I'm just having trouble getting in the damn thing. I wish mine was a simple flip top like almost every other well I see.
 
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Old 07-01-18, 02:04 PM
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Here's something that's a little weird also, when I put peroxide in my hot water tank, my cold water stops smelling also?

Is my hot water tank backing up into the cold line when it's hot? I don't get it?
 
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Old 07-01-18, 03:41 PM
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If it smells like rotten eggs is it likely sulfur bacteria. This can be fixed by shocking the well.

Follow these instructions: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/e...sinfection.pdf

what I want to know is, what's the rope for?
If you have a standard 4" well the rope is likely connected to your pitless adapter. However, a picture of what you have might be helpful.
 
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Old 07-02-18, 04:46 AM
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If you take this from post #1 and paste into your browser address bar you can see the pic. Looks like the rope would be a safety for the pump. Not sure I’m no expert.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/165504273@N02/w22ip9


(Well looks like the link works OK from this post)
 
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Old 07-02-18, 05:47 PM
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Thanks Zoesdad. I did not see that. Yeah, likely no pitless adapter there.

Well is not what I was expecting and looks a bit more difficult to open but process would still be the same as it is still a submersible well pump.

I will not comment about the free air wires going to the well.
 
 

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