Well Pump Pressure On/Off Concern

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Old 07-14-18, 09:22 PM
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Well Pump Pressure On/Off Concern

Dry summer so watering trees/yard some and got to thinking about the well pump.
Took a look this evening and it doesn't seem quite right. Been here 5 years and never paid any real attention to it (too many other items on the to do list I guess).

Pressure tank: 20 gallon
On/Off from label on switch cover: 30/50
PSI for on/off on gauge (tied into the same valve the switch is): 66-70

The needle on the gauge doesn't move much at all between the on/off cycle (guessing it at 66-70) and it cycles pretty frequently (but I don't know otherwise honestly).

Why it would be at 70 when it should only be going to 50 (per the cover label)?
Do I need to adjust the screws to actually get the correct spread?

I've added photos of the items I referenced but can get a full image of the setup if needed.
 
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Old 07-14-18, 09:55 PM
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Pressure tank may have insufficient air either due to not being prepressurized correctly or due to a ruptured bladder. In the latter case unpredictable behavior can occur and the recommend thing to do is replace the entire pressure tank. It is imposible to replace just the bladder.

Since you cannot see inside the pressure tank, putting in the correct amoutn of air is a multi step process. Start by turning off the pump and then opening a cold faucet to depressurize the entire system, and then set the pressure tank pressure to about 2 PSI less than the pump start pressure.

To really prove that the bladder has ruptured, you need to leave the pump on and let "all" of the air out of the pressure tank. If the air stops coming out and no water comes out chances are the bladder has not ruptured but you need to turn off the pump quickly to prevent unusual short cycling. Then you need to open a cold faucet, and put all the air back in (to 2 psi less then pump turn on pressure) before continuing.


If the pump does not turn on and off at the pressure points it is supposed to, then adjusting it can be tricky if all you have are uncalibrated or unscaled screw adjustments. Also it might be necessaryt to change out the nipple that feeds the pressure switch due to clogging. Or mybe change out the pressure swithc itself. I suggest replacing an old pressure switch instead of just cleaning it because the latter approach may lead to the pressure switch requiring continual attention instead of being reliable.
 
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Old 07-15-18, 05:45 AM
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First, I would replace the pressure gauge. Before you do any adjusting you must have an accurate water pressure gauge and an accurate tire pressure gauge to figure out anything.
 
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Old 07-15-18, 08:25 PM
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Thanks guys. Looks like I messed up and didn't submit my post from this morning but I picked up a 30/50 switch and new gauge this afternoon. Old gauge was definitely bad. Stayed at 60 even as it fell in the trash.

New gauge shows that it kicks on at 40 and off at 59, then settles at 54. So I guess someone in the past made the 30/50 into a 40/60-ish switch. I may go ahead and swap out the 30/50 for a 40/60, install it and keep the old as a backup.
 
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Old 07-16-18, 06:38 AM
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Don't forget to adjust the air pressure in your pressure tank. With the pump off and all water pressure bled from the system the air in the pressure tank should be 2-3 psi less than the pump's cut in (turn on) pressure.
 
 

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