Well problems: nightmares from beyond the grave


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Old 10-26-18, 07:01 AM
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Well problems: nightmares from beyond the grave

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So my wife and I have inherited this house. Unfortunately this house is like nothing I've ever worked on. This 3 bedroom 2 bath Brickhouse with well water.
So I'm begging for help now because I have no idea what's going on in this house.
I have a well I don't know what type of pump is in or what even the hardness of my water is?
I know I need to get it tested and probably need a licensed professional to look at it.
​​​​​​ So to my current problem at hand...
The supply line from my well to my house has sprung a leak. This is old galvanized iron pipe from what I can tell, and runs under a deck through my foundation to the opposite side of my house, pressure tank in garage.
With winter approaching fast I'm unsure of whether to just replace the section or the whole pipe.
Replacing the whole pipe however would require me to tunnel further under the deck all the way to the foundation or lose the deck. (Gonna replace eventually but would add days to the length of this job.)
My simple questions include:
Should I use PEX or CPVC?
Should I wrap the pipe in anything to protect it from freezing? (Yes it's below the frost line but I'm a safe than sorry person)
Does does anyone have any more tips on my water softener well set up that could help me in the future?
 
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Old 10-26-18, 07:45 AM
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I'd run PVC from the well to the tank, it's cheap and easy to work with. I wouldn't worry about insulation since it's below the frost line .... until it emerges in the garage.
 
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Old 10-26-18, 08:51 AM
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Replacing the whole pipe however would require me to tunnel further under the deck all the way to the foundation or lose the deck.
One technique of pipe replacement uses a device that can shatter old corroded pipe as a new one is pulled into its place. How successful that is depends on the condition of the old pipe. Probably not a DIY project but here is info I found:

https://offers.newconcepttools.com/s...SAAEgKin_D_BwE
 
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Old 10-26-18, 10:15 AM
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My old galvanized pipe from well head to my basement sprung a leak years ago. I planned to dig down and just fix the bad spot, but little did I know. First of all the pipe was so bad that when I started to handle it and pick it up a little bit, it started to fall apart. These old galvanized pipes get really bad.

Also, I believe most of these installations are done with 10’ pipe lengths coupled together. So it’s not a matter of cutting and patching a bad section. If you did cut out let’s say, a 1 foot bad section that was leaking, you have no way to patch in a new piece – you have no threads. So maybe you will have to dig up and replace at least a 10 foot section anyway. Just thought I’d mention that in case it’s helpful.

My well head to tank-in-basement is only 20’, so it was not that bad to replace it all – just some extra digging.

Where I live they use black poly pipe that comes in rolls and is made for water service pipe. That’s also pretty easy to install and is what I used.

Is your garage heated? Just wondering since your pressure tank is in the garage.
 
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Old 10-26-18, 12:11 PM
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Does does anyone have any more tips on my water softener well set up that could help me in the future?
If your doing the water treatment yourself then give the folks at Ohio water a call, I;ve bought all my stuff from them for years and they will help with the right equipment and not sell you anything you dont need!

https://www.ohiopurewater.com/
 
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Old 10-28-18, 11:24 PM
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Great responses

Thanks for all the advice fellas.
That is one of the things I'm worried about, I have no idea what kind of condition the rest of the pipe is in but, since it corroded through to cause the leak I can only assume it's not good.
With frost season soon approaching I'm running low on time but will probably insulate to be safe.
I will probably have to replace the entire pipe just alot for one guy. Not to mention trenching under my deck all the way to my foundation.
Yes my garage is heated.
Does everyone backfill with sand 4" above and below? I heard that's the proper way to do it

Also does anyone else have a dual filter cartridge set up on their water softener? I was just wondering because last time I dropped in a 5 and 1 micron filter and it dropped my water pressure in house to almost nothing. Now I'm using 2x 15 micron string filters and it seems ok but the pressure drop is noticable when running more then 1 faucet.

​​​​​​Updates soon, gonna crawl into the crawl space today to get some insight.
​​​​​
 
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Old 10-29-18, 03:05 AM
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Does everyone backfill with sand 4" above and below? I heard that's the proper way to do it
While backfilling with sand might be ideal - I've never done so. My service line is over 400' long buried in slate rock and I've not had any issues stemming from the slate rock.
 
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Old 10-29-18, 07:22 AM
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I went overboard with the sand (ordered min. but still too much) and probably put 8 inches of sand above and below pipe. But I only had 20 ft pipe to do, so I could do the sand thing.

I don’t have a softener but I think 15 microns is really getting down there. Maybe you could go up to 30-50 to get better pressure and see if it impacts your water quality.

I put pressure gauges before and after my filters so I can see the pressure drops. I only get a few psi drop across a filter and I thought that’s normally what you should get with a proper sized filter. Maybe one of the things to check is sizing of your filters.

(for marksr to do the sand he would have needed a entire beach LOL- but fortunately he didn't need it in his type soil)
 

Last edited by zoesdad; 10-29-18 at 07:44 AM.
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Old 10-29-18, 08:43 AM
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I dropped in a 5 and 1 micron filter and it dropped my water pressure

I have 2 whole house filters, 5 micron, and 1 micron are way, way to small for whole house filter, 20 micron is smallest needed!
 
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Old 11-09-18, 11:16 AM
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I'm back........defeated

So I given up all hope at this point. I got everything set bought the pipe got the leaking water cleaned up. Started to dig.
That's where it all went wrong. Spent hours digging and barely made it down to the pipe. Just the thought of trenching out the other 9 1/2 feet (6 feet under a deck) makes me sick.
I think I might leave this to a professional.
Thanks for all your help and support.
 
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Old 11-13-18, 08:33 AM
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Rather than digging up the entire area under the deck, could you not buy a plastic jet nozzle and hook it to a length of pvc pipe, hook that to a water hose and just blast a new hole beside the current pipe? If you are in red clay this might not work and there is an issue with the jetted area not going in a straight line if you hit a rock but it might be worth a try.
 
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Old 11-13-18, 01:28 PM
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That is a tough job. I dug a 20 foot trench about 5 foot deep (as a said in my previous post), but I forgot to mention a little thing like I did it over weeks lol (I was 70 at the time). I used bottled water for everything during the job. I could afford to stretch it out because it was just me, so I could rough it for a while. But most people canít be without running water for that long.

I donít blame you for getting the pros to come in and do it. (Maybe lakeseeds idea would work)

Good luck!
 
 

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