Two well tanks: which is correct


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Old 01-07-19, 06:11 AM
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Two well tanks: which is correct

what the correct way to install two tanks
 
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Old 01-07-19, 06:49 AM
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I'm not one of the experts but from what I understand the switch should be between the two tanks as in the first diagram.

I guess that makes sense since I believe it is also the case that you want the switch as close to the tank as possible, and there really are two tanks there.
 
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Old 01-07-19, 07:24 AM
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It should not make any difference, the pressure switch will read the total pressure in the system which is effected by both tanks so in front or behind the difference is negotiable!
 
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Old 01-07-19, 08:04 AM
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I'm with Marq1. The switch location doesn't really matter since all it's doing is reading the water pressure.
 
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Old 01-07-19, 10:50 AM
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I think it is stressed that your pressure switch should be no more than 6 feet from your tank otherwise you can get poor readings and even chatter at the switch. Supposedly, the closer the switch is to the tank the better.
 
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Old 01-07-19, 11:11 AM
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I think the main reason for that is to reduce the slight differences, that can be obtained from longer distances, between the pressure of the tank and the pressure upon the switch. Many times a person has the air set in the pressure tank only 2 psi below the pressure of the cut in on the switch. A few psi difference between them, due to longer distances, can cause issues with your system.

For most, the only issue with a tank 10ft away, or even 20 ft away from the switch, is that instead of the pump cutting in at 30psi and out at 50psi it might actually be cutting in at 32psi and out at 52psi, for example. Probably not even noticeable to the person in the shower. The only thing they might notice is a little less draw down of water from the tank, between pump cycles. The other issue with different pressures might also come from the fact that when the pump is on, it is supplying the pressure and when it is off, the tank is supplying the pressure. You really want those pressures to be as close to each other as you can, hence the 6ft rule.
 
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Old 01-07-19, 07:33 PM
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f talked to a person at the company that made the tanks and he said between the two tanks. He also said to check with both tanks empty to make sure they are both at the air pressure. I did and they were not fixed that now both tanks are filling with water. I ended up with two tanks when I put the well in in 2012 because the first tank I purchased from Home Depot had a dent in it and Home Depot said that would send me a new one. I ask what they wanted me to do with the other one. They said to throw it away and I did not. UPS damaged the tank
 
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Old 01-08-19, 04:44 AM
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If you are located somewhere that gets cold keep in mind that two pressure tanks and their increased storage capacity can work against you. If you get a particularly cold snap and decide to crack a faucet to prevent pipes from freezing doesn't work as well with pressure tanks in the system. The more storage capacity you have the less frequently your well will turn on. So, even though you let a faucet drip it could be many hours that no water moves in the water line to your well.
 
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Old 01-08-19, 10:04 AM
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Each tank should have its pressure preset as if it were the only tank in the system, namely about 2 PSI below pump turn on pressure while the pump is off and a cold faucet upstairs open.

So long as neither tank bottoms out there will be no pressure irregularities due to either tank.

In typical operation the amount of water in a pressure tank will vary from almost none to about a third of the tank volume. The minimum fraction of space still occupied by air is approximately the ratio of the pump turn on pressure to the pump turn off pressure.

With tank #2 downstream of the pressure switch there is an increased chance that the tank could bottom out. If this turns out to be a problem then preset its pressure a little lower, say to pump turn on pressure minus 4 PSI.
 
 

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