Making a pump discharge bypass


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Old 10-11-19, 06:23 AM
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Making a pump discharge bypass

My basement has a sump pump attached to the septic system--i.e., pump to 1.5" PVC pipe, connected to the outflow in the basement. That's how it's been for decades.

Rarely, flooding can be so bad (I'm right on the coast) that the septic system can get backed up (I suppose it's from saltwater covering the manholes and getting into the waste pipes). When that happens, the pump stops working. I have back flow valves to keep a reversal from happening, but I still need an emergency method to divert the flow.

When that happens (1-2 times in the last decade, not counting crazy things like hurricanes) I've had to detach the PVC from the pump and replace it with corrugated black pipe, the other and of which I toss out a window. This is a big PITA, especially as I'm operating underwater.

I keep thinking about replacing it with a better option: adding a diverter valve. I couldn't find a Y diverter with valves on both outputs (I didn't look too hard, only for what's locally available) but I don't think that would address the issue: the valve narrowing the flow. Looking at a 1.5" ball valve, the pipe narrows quite a bit; the pump is 1/2 hp rated at 4250 gpm, and I thought the valve would greatly restrict output.

Would it work to use an adapter to a 2" pipe? So Y connector to short 1.5" pipe, to 1.5-2" adapter, a 2" ball valve, to a 2 to 1.5" adapter, to the hose?

_____>1.5-2"adapter>valve>1.5-2" adapter>black plastic pipe
-----/__________>sewer

Would I also need a valve on the PVC-sewer line?
 
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Old 10-11-19, 06:40 AM
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As you've found there aren't Y fittings with valves on them. They are sold as individual pieces. So, you will buy a Y and two valves and assemble them together as needed.

Generally the restriction in ball valves is not an issue but that depends on the valves you are considering. You can use adapters to go up to a larger size if you wish which will improve the flow.
 
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Old 10-11-19, 07:52 AM
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Is it code that your sump run into the septic field.

If not why not just pump it out onto the yard all the time.
 
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Old 10-11-19, 04:50 PM
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My basement has a sump pump attached to the septic system
I feel that may be a mistake. Rarely, if ever, do you discharge the sump pump into a septic system.
 
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Old 10-12-19, 09:19 AM
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Been piped that way for 40+ years.
 
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Old 10-12-19, 10:41 AM
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flooding can be so bad (I'm right on the coast) that the septic system can get backed up
Sure. Septic system don't have unlimited capabilities.
 
 

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