Well Pressure Tank Replacement


  #1  
Old 09-05-20, 06:44 PM
T
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Well Pressure Tank Replacement

I think it time to replace my pressure tank. It looks to me to be the original one so it would be 45 years old based upon the age of the house. It is a Quick Flo Deluxe glass line steel tank 5" tall. There is rust on the lower out side from condensation. It can't last forever.

I will replace it with a bladder style but how long should I expect a new tank to last and does the brand make a difference? Lowes has Waterworker and A.O Smith brands or I can get the Amtrol Well X tank for 50% more. Is it worth the difference? are there other brands I should look at?

As to the size I measured 13 gallons of water removed to drop the pressure from 50 psi down to 25 psi where the pump turned on and it took 4 1/2 minutes to refill. I think I need a 34 gallon tank for similar performance. Does that sound right.

Well info
Submersible, 120V 7A
Depth unknown

Thanks
Tom
 
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Old 09-06-20, 08:37 AM
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hi tj -

Are your numbers correct? A 40 gallon 5 foot high tank would be about 14 inches in diameter. It seems like all the well pressure tanks I’ve seen are more squatty than that. But I’m no expert for sure so that certainly could be your tank dimensions.

Just to double check: If it took 4.5 minutes to replace that 13 gallons then you are pumping a little less than 3 gallons per minute. That’s a little low I think but from what I understand 3 gallons/minute would be OK for a 2 person household.

I replaced my old A.O. Smith well pressure tank with a WELL-X-TROL only because everything I’ve ever read about them ranks them very high. My understanding is that it’s because of the quality of their materials. Those tanks are a little expensive however.

Also, my understanding, the bigger the tank the better. The bigger the tank the more you get on drawdown, so the fewer pump starts, which translates to longer pump life, which translates to less money spent since pulling a pump from the well for replacement is very expensive.

(It's the pump start-stop that causes the pump wear. Once they start running the more they pump on the run the better.)
 
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Old 09-06-20, 06:19 AM
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I do not know the answers to any of your questions.

But ...

Try adding a little air to the pressure tank (using an air compressor or a bike pump). To no more than 5 PSI above what it was before.

See if the amount of water you can draw before the pump restarts is greater.

Repeat if desired. Except if air puffs out of the faucet then do not repeat. Except if the amount of water you can now draw is less than it was before.

The best amount of gallons you can draw before the pump restarts is roughly one third of the capacity of the pressure tank. (The exact percentage depends on the pump start pressure and pump stop pressure.


 
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Old 09-07-20, 07:44 AM
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AllanJ - I am not sure what adding pressure to the tank will do for me?

zoesdad - Yes the tank is 60" tall and 20" in diameter. It is the old style without a bladder. It has a volume of 80 gal. I am thinking that a replacement bladder tank does not have to be as big, My pump run time looks good to me so am just trying to size the replacement tank. Recovery does not seem great but it works for me. I am not dropping a new pump. How long did your A.O Smith tank last?

Tom
 
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Old 09-07-20, 08:51 AM
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hi -

The tank was in the house when in 2002 I moved in. I replaced it in 2016. It developed a few very small rust spots on the outside as you noticed on yours. Sure enough, after a while one of the rust spots turned into a small hole which started to spray water. That happened in 2016. Iím pretty sure that the tank was nowhere near new when I moved in, so it lasted for a quite a few years.

But I think there must be something wrong however with your system at this time. If that is an 80 gallon tank I think you should be getting much more than 13 gallons drawdown. Iím pretty it should be roughly about a third of the volume as Allan said.

You probably need more air in the tank. I think the tanks without the separation of air/water with a diaphragm, operate such that the air gets absorbed into the water over time and so more air has to be added to the tank.
 
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Old 09-07-20, 09:37 AM
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Maybe it needs more air for max draw down but my pump is not short cycling so I just want to keep the same pump time when I replace the tank. Besides I thought that for a bladderless tank you just emptied the tank and refilled it for the correct head. Ok, thinking about it, just adding 5 psi or so would be the easier than emptying it but I still thinks it needs changing.
 
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Old 09-07-20, 10:50 AM
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I think you are right, for 13 gallons of drawdown you would only need about a 40 gallon tank. With the tank you have now, will proper air, you would have twice that drawdown. But if everything is OK now with the ways things are, then I think things would stay the same if you switched to a 40 gallon tank.

(I just double checked and I put in the new tank in 2018 not 2016, so the A.O.Smith tank had 16 years usage for me and I donít know how many years usage prior.)
 
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Old 09-30-20, 03:56 PM
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We have 2 wells, one with a bladder-less tank and one with a bladder tank. The bladder-less can be aired by draining the tank allowing air in at the top via schrader valve, although i do have compressed air but you can't go wrong allowing atmospheric air in. It's about 45 years old.

The bladder tank has been changed 3 times in 35 years. I'll take the bladder-less any time over a bladder and add air about once / month.

Search the net to determine if a 13 gallon draw down bladder tank is available.

 
 

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