New well water filter system

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-17-20, 09:08 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 187
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
New well water filter system

It's something I should have done years ago. Ever since the well system was changed from a jet pump to a submerged pump 10 years ago I've been getting some sand/dirt coming in. It's all new, installed 2 days ago so I don't know how often I'll need to attend to the filter. What I wonder is what do others do when they need attention... do you clean them or replace them each time? The system installed has a bypass, so I could run the filter under a hose outside or basement sink inside to clean it off.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-17-20, 09:55 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 47
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I installed a sediment tank to catch anything heavier than water followed by a filter change approximately 2 x / year and drain the sediment tank bottom off about once / year. The filter change frequency will certainly vary from well system to system. The filters I use are not washable.
I can say with certainty any of that well debris must be kept from entering the washing machine water valve.
 
  #3  
Old 10-17-20, 01:47 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,527
Received 367 Votes on 342 Posts
Would help immensely if you could tell us what type of filter you installed and what type of filter media your using!
 
  #4  
Old 10-17-20, 02:05 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 187
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
It's a Viqua model AWP40C-V. The filter appears to be similar to a vehicle air cleaner, white corrugated material. And yes re: the washing machine water valve - once it was so bad the tub filled up with water since the valve couldn't shut completely due to the sediment. That reminds me I should clean the filter. Several years ago I installed shut off valves to the washing machine because of that. Probably a good idea not to have water in the hoses when it's not running anyway.

 

Last edited by stevek66; 10-17-20 at 03:28 PM.
  #5  
Old 10-18-20, 05:01 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,527
Received 367 Votes on 342 Posts
So it looks to be similar to my Big Blue whole hose filters. I have 2, one for the house and one for the GEO heat.

I get a little sediment, maybe a half a teaspoon every time I change my filters which I do every 3 months, mainly they help remove visible rust.

You are going to have to pick a time period and filter size and experiment.

If sediment is the main issue Id start with 20 micron filters, anything smaller will simply get plugged up fast and then your water flow will suffer.

They make washable filters, pleated filters, and polypropylene.

I use the polypropylene since they are the cheapest and I'm not going to waste my time cleaning those slimy used filter.
 
  #6  
Old 10-18-20, 05:35 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,821
Received 96 Votes on 75 Posts
I have an AP102 whole house filter. It uses two 5 micron AP110 filters. The filters are not reusable. They are great at removing sand and grit from the well. We get very little debris in the faucet filters. I probably change them a couple of times a year.

I shocked my well two weeks ago and ran quite a bit of water through the house plumbing to flush the chlorine. When I finished I replaced the filters. They had a 1/4" coating of sand/mud and iron and we were still getting flow through the fixtures.
 
  #7  
Old 10-18-20, 06:48 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 187
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Then I should forget about considering washing the filters. I'll do some research what's available locally and online. Others have said 3 months is a common time period to change the filter - since this is all new to me time will tell.
 
  #8  
Old 10-18-20, 07:35 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,527
Received 367 Votes on 342 Posts
It's just something your going to have to try, is the existing filter washable?

As noted I have never tried one, when my filters come out they are totally infused with dirt, rust, slime, crud. I just toss them into the fire pit!
 
  #9  
Old 10-18-20, 08:03 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 187
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I'll need to see if the existing filter is washable. It's already showing slight signs of filtration (dirty) after just a couple days.

Interesting you mention rust - maybe that's a fringe benefit I wasn't aware of. The bathtub caulking has discoloration due to rust, or what appears to be rust color.
 
  #10  
Old 10-18-20, 09:22 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,821
Received 96 Votes on 75 Posts
If your filter is appearing dirty that means it's doing it's job. Mine turn completely brown within a couple of days.

Your filter housing will probably accept any 4"X10" filter. They are reasonably cheap and readily available on line so you might try a tighter filter next time to see if it has a noticeable effect on flow rate and longevity.

You might consider getting your well water tested. Iron in water can be removed but a whole house filter won't solve an iron problem.
 

Last edited by cwbuff; 10-18-20 at 09:54 AM.
  #11  
Old 10-18-20, 10:10 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,527
Received 367 Votes on 342 Posts
[QUOTE] a whole house filter won't solve an iron problem.[/QUOTE

Partially true, there are 2 types soluble and un soluble. Filters will remove the un soluble but wont touch the soluble!
 
  #12  
Old 10-18-20, 10:58 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 187
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Yes the filter already appears quite affective - and reveals what was coming out of the faucets all these years. More than I thought. I should have asked the plumbing guys to bring back a water sample to their shop as they do testing there.

The same 'rust' - or slight rust color will appear around the bathroom sink within several days - but not to the extent around the bathtub. So there is something in the water, soluble or un soluble. I heard of those terms applying to consumable fiber, but never iron!

 
  #13  
Old 10-18-20, 12:38 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 187
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
This replacement filter (the one for my model) claims to also be effective for rust - they mean iron?


 
  #14  
Old 10-18-20, 01:37 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,821
Received 96 Votes on 75 Posts
I think that is a 5 micron filter but you'll notice the verbiage attached "effectively tackle rust, sediment, and dirt." I'm not sure what that means but it doesn't mention removing or filtering of iron. In fact it doesn't mention iron at all. As Marq said, it will intercept some iron chunks but it will have little if any impact on soluble iron. There are several types of iron found in well water - and there are several systems available to remove them.

I had my well tested in July. The pre filter iron level (hose bib closest to the well) was .07 mg/L. At the kitchen sink downstream from the filter it was .07 mg/L. Recommended level in our area is 0.3 mg/L. Our water is well within suggested (not mandated by the state/EPA) level yet my filter is brown just a couple of days after changing. If we are away for more than a few days we have to run the water until the brown goes away.

If you decide to get your water tested get it done at a certified lab. There may be a conflict of interest if you get it down by the same guy that's going to want to sell you a fix for your problem. The plumber that installed my well tank wanted to get the water tested by a company that sells water softeners and filters. I went elsewhere.
 
  #15  
Old 10-18-20, 02:20 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,527
Received 367 Votes on 342 Posts
For reference the filters i just purchased were $4 each, filters are not the total solution and many other options exist to provide clean water, it's not voodoo but there are ways to do it cheap or do it expensive!

s as many will attest, just simple step by step solutions.
 
  #16  
Old 10-18-20, 05:16 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 187
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Right - I wish they could elaborate on 'effectively tackle'. That would be nice if there was some kind of DIY or home water testing kit. As mentioned... the response from a particular service could be biased toward their own products. Right now I'm not in a position to add anything else to the cost of the filter system. At some point I would like to get the water tested. This (good/informative) thread now has me wondering about the results. I had the water tested 35 years ago when I bought the house. If I recall nothing alarming or any requirement for any treatment. But could things change?

Wow what an elaborate setup in the photo! Just a bit (yeah right!) more complicated than mine. And before last week - mine was just a pump in the well, pressure switch and holding tank. In new houses do they now use PVC for a well water system?
 

Last edited by stevek66; 10-18-20 at 06:45 PM.
  #17  
Old 10-19-20, 01:02 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Southern Arizona
Posts: 149
Received 8 Votes on 8 Posts
I am providing this link as a alternate idea for particles/dirt/sand in the water.
These filters are easy to clean, you do not have to replace the filter, just open the drain and flush the sediment away. I installed one of these ahead of the paper filter for my new house.
Spin filters are high volume and high pressure compared to paper/media which can lower pressure.
Most you can order with different size filters.

https://www.amazon.com/Rusco-Vu-Flow.../dp/B018HFRYXA
 
  #18  
Old 10-19-20, 01:55 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,821
Received 96 Votes on 75 Posts
You can buy test kits on line for various water contaminants. Google water quality test strips. You can get them for most of the common things found in wells including iron and bacteria. They are DIY and results are available almost instantly.

I'm using a 5 in 1 from Aqua Tech that cost $20. The kit (litmus strips) tests for chlorines, hardness, PH and alkalinity. I shocked my well a couple of weeks ago and have been using them to monitor chlorine levels. After the chlorine was gone I had my well tested again.

However, if you have never had your well water tested you might consider having it done by a lab. In my area a standard spectrum test including radon runs about $150.
 
  #19  
Old 10-20-20, 03:53 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 187
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
The alternate system in the link looks like that would have been what I needed. I'll just have to observe how this does and have filters on hand. The reason I considered cleaning the filter was because it appears to be similar to the pool filter I used to have. The procedure was to take it out and clean it with a hose. After a few years it should then be replaced. I know we're talking an entirely different system here.

I'll check online for test kits. I'll also see if I saved the well water report from 35 years ago - probably not.
 
  #20  
Old 10-20-20, 11:15 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,527
Received 367 Votes on 342 Posts
You might want to look at that spin down filter, it's for irrigation systems, the micron screen is equivalent a 100 micron, it's not the same as a whole house filer set up.
 
  #21  
Old Yesterday, 01:23 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 182
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
Your copper pipes and well water are a possible disaster in the making, The Ph of the well water eats away over time at the copper and causes leaks. If you do not have a acid neutralizing filter, you should check the Ph of the water and consider adding such a device. They are expensive and can save a much greater expense.
 
  #22  
Old Yesterday, 01:27 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 182
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
From personal experience I can say the spin down filters are not effective at removing fine sediment. Wast of money for this purpose.
 
  #23  
Old Yesterday, 01:54 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,821
Received 96 Votes on 75 Posts
Some wells are acidic and some are alkaline. My well is slightly alkaline and about half the house supply plumbing is copper. We have no issues with corrosion.
 
  #24  
Old Yesterday, 03:06 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 47
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
COPIED: Sediment - matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid.

My home made definition is, matter that has a specific gravity greater than, in this instance , water.

A repurposed electric water heater tank has all the connections to make a sediment tank for well water. The whole house filters will take care of the remainder of the non-sedimentary matter to the point of the micron you choose.

In my opinion, better than a re- cycled electric water tank is a gas hot water tank because of the taller height. Those also have all the necessary connections to make a sediment tank. The one I made has been in service for about 35 years.

 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: