Best way to address sump pump issue

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Old 01-26-21, 02:34 PM
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Best way to address sump pump issue

I have a Zoeller M53 sump pump in our basement that discharges water from the clothes washer/utility sink/whole-house humidifier. The tag on the pump says it was installed in 2015 (which is before I lived in the house).

I've had a few times recently where the pump has failed to kick on even though the float is pushed all the way up. If I reach a hook in and pull up on the lever just to test it it successfully kicks it on.

I have three options on hand to deal with it, and I'm just curious what you would say is best (at least to start with):
- I could tie the float switch arm up in the on position and employ a piggyback styled float
- I have a Zoeller float switch replacement kit, so I could try switching it out
- I also have a brand new pump on standby, so I could just switch the whole thing out if it's not worth messing with a 6 year old sump pump

Any opinions on how I should proceed? I'm a plumbing novice so this is new territory for me.

Thanks in advance.

 
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Old 01-26-21, 02:55 PM
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I think the arm and switch contacts get gunked up and then won't fully switch on when it rises slowly. Because who ever cleans them? I bet if you did a little scrubbing on the pivots and contacts with a little brass or plastic brush, and maybe added some lube, it might help for a while.
 
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Old 01-26-21, 03:04 PM
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That's what spare pump is for. Remove current pump, install spare pump. Work on old pump on a bench at at your leisure.
Oh at the same time learn more about your system.
 
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Old 01-26-21, 03:31 PM
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Sounds like the new pump is on layaway not spare.

Why not use the switch replacement kit? You will probably find the the existing one is corroded gummed up and can be fixed easily.
 
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Old 01-26-21, 03:59 PM
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The switch is easy to replace.
If you find water in with the switch..... check the power cord grommet.
 
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Old 01-26-21, 05:13 PM
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Thanks for the tips so far. I own the new/spare pump, so putting it in temporarily or permanently is an option.
 
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Old 01-28-21, 07:13 AM
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I would recommend a new switch over refurbishing the existing switch.
... lube, it might help for awhile ...
True, but the old switch is likely to need readjustments and recleanings, namely continual attention that you would rather not worry about


 
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Old 01-28-21, 07:44 AM
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I own the new/spare pump, so putting it in temporarily or permanently is an option.
If there is room in the sump for two pumps you could get a dual pump control. That would alternate the pumps for longer life and automatically start the second pump if the first one fails.
 
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Old 01-28-21, 11:55 AM
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For the time being, I opted to put in the new pump and take out the old one. Been spending too much time planning/stressing and just needed to move forward. I may at some point in the future open up the old one to see if it looks like it needs a new switch and then I'll take it from there, or I'll just save the switch kit and apply it to this new pump in the future if/when it needs it.

Thanks again for the tips and opinions.
 
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Old 01-28-21, 03:48 PM
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Easy enough once you figure out how to untie the cord.
 
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Old 01-28-21, 03:51 PM
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That's a fact!
Out of curiosity, I popped the top off the older one. I don't see any obvious signs of water inside, but there appears to be a little bit of an oily substance puddled in the groove in the top where the wire ends connect on the body of the pump. Is that abnormal?
 
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Old 01-28-21, 04:20 PM
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The motor windings are immersed in mineral oil. A small amount may have leached into the groove. Does not indicate a problem.
 
 

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