Out of the blue sump pump cycle with no rain


  #1  
Old 08-29-21, 11:25 PM
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Out of the blue sump pump cycle with no rain

Iíve had a notification system on my sump pump for about 3 years now and it typically only runs after we get rain (especially in summer). However for about the last six weeks it has been cycling once a day with clear water (which for me is about 45-50 gallons). Itís never done this previously. Hereís my thoughts/what Iíve checked -

1) turned off house water and monitored main at street- no change
2) all my plumbing is pex in the basement so I can see all pipes/drain lines
3) we put a pond in about a year ago (has been full for about 6 months). Itís about 75í away from house on flat ground and roughly same depth as basement floor. Heavy clay soils
4) typical rain totals over last 6-8 weeks
5) humidifier and air con condensation drain into pit but canít imagine thatís more than 10-20 gallons a day

Iím thinking it has something to do with pond but seems odd that an impact would have taken that long. Iím not overly worried about the 50 gallons/day but want to make sure itís not something thatís going to get worse.

thoughts/ideas on what to check?

 
  #2  
Old 08-30-21, 01:26 AM
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A sump pump that pumps out 45-50 gal's. with no rain Hmm.
How do you know how many gal's it's really pumping out?
Pond that far away, also not the issue.
#1, There's no location in your profile so no one has a clue what typical rain falls are.
Many things can cause this, high water table, no gutters, improper grade away from the foundation, foundation was never sealed,
No one even knows what type foundation you even have, with that little info.

 
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Old 08-30-21, 02:19 AM
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So what is different, the pond. Took a few months for water to find a spot to form a small leak path!
 
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Old 08-30-21, 03:02 AM
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I think Joe is on the right path. We need lots more information.
 
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Old 08-30-21, 03:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Marq1
Agreed. In almost all cases, a pond goes into the low point behind the house. Which is also the natural course for surface water and shallow drainage.
I'll make an educated guess that construction of the pond ALSO required removal of a few trees?
What usually happens is that the tree roots look for water and naturally seek out the low point in the yard where water collects- basements and swales.
If you remove the tree, the roots will rot away, leaving natural paths for water to work back from the low point at the pond to the basement.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 08-30-21 at 03:29 AM.
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Old 08-30-21, 06:42 AM
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Thanks - Hereís a few more data points


  • House is in central Ohio with poured concrete walls
  • # of gallons is based up pump size estimate (using Pump Spy backup system)
  • We have done gutters, underground downspouts, grading,etc a few years ago when the house was built
  • We did not have to remove any trees for pond construction
 
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Old 08-30-21, 11:06 AM
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Is this a submersible or an upright? If it's an upright has anybody changed the limits of the float?
If it's a submersible then I'm guessing a faulty float switch.
 
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Old 08-30-21, 11:19 AM
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Itís a zoeller pump paired with a glentronics float controller. Typically I have it set to where the water sits about an inch below the float switch, but itís been rising the extra inch and tripping the float
 
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Old 08-30-21, 11:34 AM
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Zollar is a good pump. It's what I have also. Have you checked your water meter readings compared to last year or several months previously? You might have a water main break between your meter and the street supply line. That in turn is seeking it's way as ground water into your sump lines.
 
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Old 08-30-21, 06:18 PM
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I turned water off for an hour and there was zero movement in the meter.
 
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Old 08-30-21, 06:28 PM
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But you're still getting water in the pit. Compare your water consumption with previous times. If you have a line rupture before the meter you won't see any movement of the meter.
Is your front lawn wet or more moist than other parts or your neighbors?
 
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Old 08-31-21, 05:00 AM
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My house is about 500í from the meter itself (meter is at road). With that much line maybe I should try leaving house water off for a longer time period)
 
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Old 08-31-21, 07:05 AM
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My house is about 500’ from the meter itself (meter is at road).
Yes in that case . do that. Are finding any of he lawn along the water inlet line to be greener than most of the other area's? Or is the ground softer?
 
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Old 08-31-21, 10:06 AM
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Nothing that Iíve noticed - but my water line is 3-4í below grade and comes in the wall of the basement
 
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Old 08-31-21, 10:30 AM
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If you can't find an alternative source or reason for the extra water, you may want to call a plumber and using an endoscope or sewer cam have him check your lines for leakage. At least that will be a minimum charge vs a dig up of the front lawn or more and will at least eliminate that as a possibility one way or the other.
The next step might be calling the town and asking if they might check the lines in front of the meter. How about neighbors? are they experiencing similar?
Beyond that I'm all out of possibilities, unless you have a neighbor with a pool leak.
 
 

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