Need advice on purchasing new well tank


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Old 09-02-22, 09:13 AM
K
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Need advice on purchasing new well tank

Hi All,


We are on well water where we live in rural Connecticut and looks like the pressure tank (bladder type) has gone bad. I recently noticed it short cycling so yesterday I tested it. I turned off the well pump and drained all the water and checked the air pressure and it literally read zero. I attempted to add air using a compressor but it would not hold any pressure at all. I then closed the drain valve and turned the pump back on and it started up and then clicked off when it got to 50 PSI as per usual. I then depressed the valve pin which sprayed out some dirty water so seems based on everything I have read here that the bladder is damaged/broken.

The existing broken tank is from 1997 so it has done pretty well I guess. it is a Sta-Rite Con-Aire CA42 and I believe it is 20 gallons. The well is 95 feet deep and the pump was installed in 1996 and is a Goulds 7GS05422C, 7GPM, 1/2HP...

Goulds 7GS05422C, 7GPM, 1/2HP, 230V


So I am wondering how to choose a replacement pressure tank. I checked Home Depot and they have Water Worker brand and have 20, 44, 86 and 119 gallon options ranging from $189 - $799. I also checked Lowes and they have A.O. Smith brand and have 20, 36, 52 and 86 gallon options ranging from $204 - $499.


Are these brands decent or should I be looking for a specific brand or brands for better quality/longer life? I also read that I can get a larger tank which will make the pump cycle less and potentially last longer. Is there any downside to a larger tank?

I attached pics of the well line and the tank etc. Thanks for any advice.


Ken.





 
  #2  
Old 09-02-22, 12:01 PM
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K -

What I was able to gather after a lot of checking before I replaced my last tank, was that there is no down side to a larger tank. The bigger the better. I think for the reason you mentioned – fewer start/stops for the pump, and that allows the pump to last longer. It’s just that - as you probably have noticed - bigger is more expensive.

It seems pump manufacturers want the pump to run for at least 1 minute if the pump is 1/2 HP and at least 2 minutes for 3/4 HP. You may already know this but the tank specs will have a drawdown number. That’s the number of gallons you can draw out of the tank at a certain pressure.

For example, I see a Well-X-Trol 20 gal tank will have a drawdown on 6.8 gals at 30-50 psi range and 5.9 gals at 40-60 range. So a 7 GPM pump would run for about not quite a minute with that tank.

If I were you I would go bigger than a 20 gallon if you can afford it.

I’m no expert for sure, but I believe the Well-X-Trol is a high quality tank – but they are more expensive. That’s what I bought. I think that A.O. Smith tanks are pretty good (that’s what I had before).

Looks like you got your money’s worth from that tank. Maybe WaterWorker is OK. Tough decision: are the more expensive pressure tanks really worth it. I just bit the bullet and bought a Well-X-Trol which I know has a very good reputation.

Maybe one of the pros will jump in who has a lot of experience with different brands.

 
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Old 09-02-22, 02:54 PM
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The bigger the better
That is correct.

The bigger the tank the more water you will get without the pump cycling.
My go-to brand has always been Well-X-trol.
 
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Old 09-02-22, 04:21 PM
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Another benefit of a larger tank is more water storage when the power goes out. You don't know how much is in the tank but it can be nice if your soaped up in the shower when the lights go out. Every extra gallon of storage capacity can make the difference of getting rinsed off or being able to flush the toilets a few times during an outage.
 
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Old 09-08-22, 12:57 PM
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Hi All,


Thanks for all the advice. In the end I went with a Water Worker 44 Gallon tank. I went with Water Worker as it was a lot more affordable (I have kids in college) so I will have to wait and see how well it holds up over the long term. I went with the 44 Gallon model as it was the largest that was in stock locally and certain family members were getting tired of no running water. I reused the Tank Tee that I already had since getting a longer one would have meant I would need to replace a lot of other components due to the different size connections etc. I just extended the length by adding a 5 inch 1-1/4 brass nipple and a 1-1/4 x 1 brass coupling. I had to redo a bit of the copper piping since the tank is bigger but everything went well and no leaks so that is good. Here is a pic of the new tank...




The tank is actually made by AMTROL INC but costs around half what an equivalent Well-X-Trol would cost and has a 5 year warranty whereas the name brand tank has a 7 year warranty. I will follow up at some point with details on any issues etc.


Ken.
 
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Old 09-08-22, 01:55 PM
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Looks good to me. No leaks means you are home free. Good luck.
 
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Old 09-09-22, 06:20 AM
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Didn't see this thread earlier. After having 2 Water Worker tanks fail, I finally installed an X-Trol. They were under warranty, but still, the hassle of replacing them was a PITA. hopefully you'll have better luck with yours. I do recall that their customer service was excellent.
 
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Old 11-01-22, 08:00 PM
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Incidentally, if you are installing a new pressure tank, you can leave the old tank in place if that is still working properly and space allows. Preset each to the same 2 PSI less than pump start pressure.

The performance will be equal to a single pressure tank of size equal to the combined capacity of the two tanks.
 
 

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