Well pump question


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Old 09-29-22, 06:11 PM
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Well pump question

There's a utility faucet (boiler drain style) between our well feed and the basement tank, and the faucet is leaking. I need to replace it, but there's no shutoff between the faucet and the well line that comes in through the basement wall. Just double-checking...if I shut-off the well pump's electrical circuit, then drain all the water that's in the lines and the tank, replace the faucet, then turn the pump's electrical back on, that's not going to cause any damage to the pump, is it?

2013 well, 90' deep, AquaDuty submersible pump.
 
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Old 09-29-22, 06:23 PM
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What you propose will be fine. If there is a valve after the pressure tank, close that to avoid draining all the water in the house piping.

After you repair or replace the drain faucet keep it open and start the pump. When water starts to flow through it, close it and let the tank come up to pressure. Then open the valve to the house. Expect some air to come out at each faucet, toilet, etc. the next time they are used.
 
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  #3  
Old 09-29-22, 06:41 PM
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Great, thank you for the advice!
 
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Old 09-29-22, 08:15 PM
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While you have the tank empty, it's a good opportunity to check the air charge pressure in the tank. Pressure tanks (except really old ones) have a bladder inside. There is air above the bladder, and the water is below. When the tank is completely empty the air pressure above the bladder should be 2-3 PSI below the cut-in pressure of the pump. So if the pump normally turns on when the water pressure falls to 40 PSI, the air pressure in the empty tank should be 37-38 PSI. You check the pressure with a tire gauge; there will be a tire valve (schrader valve) near the top of the tank. Valve may be under a plastic cover. Bladder tanks usually maintain the pressure pretty well over time, but since it has to be checked when the tank is empty, it makes sense to check it while you are replacing the valve.
 
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Old 09-30-22, 08:38 AM
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Faucet has been replaced. Bladder tank pressure was 31 PSI when empty. Pump is kicking on around 36 PSI, and kicking off around 55 PSI. Thanks again for the advice! Guessing the 5 PSI difference isn't ideal, but probably not that big of a deal? Check it every 6 to 12 months to keep an eye on it and if it gets too large of a gap then replace the tank?
 
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Old 09-30-22, 08:51 AM
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No need to replace the tank unless water comes out of the schrader valve when depressed, which indicates the bladder is leaking. You can just add air with a tire pump (or a compressor) to get the pressure where it needs to be. Of course that has to be done with the tank empty and the drain valve open so you are getting a true reading.

5PSI below cut-in is not a big deal...it increases the stress on the bladder a small amount (compared to 3 PSI) because the bladder gets compressed a little more when the tank is at max pressure, But I wouldn't drain the tank again just to add 2 PSI. Just top it up next time you have to empty the tank for any reason. Checking it once a year is plenty as long as the system seems to be working normally. If the bladder fails completely or looses a lot of air, you will hear odd noises or the pump will start acting odd, like short cycling.
 
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