Washer basin and pump


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Old 01-22-23, 08:23 PM
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Washer basin and pump

Hey all, I just installed a drain pan under my washing machine. For peace of mind I would like to add a sump pump to the pan in the event that anything leaks. The only place I have for drainage is the washer drain pipe. I am having trouble finding a suitable pump. A 1/4 hp sump pump with float switch seems like overkill? And a condensate pump is too small i believe. Any suggestions??

 
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Old 01-23-23, 06:18 AM
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How are you going to add a sump pump to a washing machine pan? There isn't room as most pans are only slightly larger than the washing machine. The pans sometimes have a hole for adding an overflow tube but that's it. No provisions for a pump. Also, sump pumps need a certain depth of water to work which will likely be too deep to work with a washing machine pan.

No, you cannot discharge into the washer's standpipe. That is where the washing machine discharges and it cannot be shared. You would need a separate connection and trap to your house's drain system for a pump.
 
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Old 01-23-23, 08:26 AM
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No, catch pans are not intended to be used with pumps. The fitting is to attach a drain pipe (gravity).
 
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Old 01-23-23, 07:34 AM
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Thanks for the response. You are correct there is no room for a pump. I do however have the ability to make a metal pan, my thought was to add a kick-out for a pump.

Back to the existing plastic pan, yes it did come with a hose connection that you can cut in. Is this not for attaching a pump?





 
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Old 01-23-23, 12:42 PM
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Thanks Pilot Dane. Ok I realize that now. Let me riddle you this. I could build a 28x28 pan, 12" deep, welded stainless. My math says this will hold 39 gallons. Well probably a little less with the washer sitting in it. Do you think this is a good idea? (I could go as much as 32x32 if needed)

We just finished the basement including laminate flooring and there is no floor drain or any other type of drainage other than the washer discharge drain tied to the 4" main waste line. The washer is on the daylight side of the basement so technically above ground. I would rather be safe than sorry. At least this way if anything happened I suppose I could shop vac the water out.
 

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Old 01-23-23, 03:22 PM
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Any pan will eventually overflow so capacity is rather unimportant if you don't include some mechanism to turn off the supply of water.

Have you ever tried to get a washer into and out of a 12" deep pan? Try it and you'll experience the first problem with your deep pan plan. The second is the shape & size. If making a pan make sure you size it to fit your machine. There is no "standard" size. Top loaders tend to be more square while front loaders are rectangular and modern machines can be quite large.

If concerned about a water leak I'd get a leak alarm with automatic shutoff valves for the washer. If there is a leak the water hits the sensor on the floor which commands the water valves to close.
 
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Old 01-23-23, 04:55 PM
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Pilot Dane, I get your point. I was worried about the machine itself leaking (just had a gearbox issue) but not thinking about the supply side. Could you recommend a leak detector? I have hot and cold stubbed into a small plastic drywall box each with a small shutoff valve. They appear to have a threaded connection but I am not sure what to expect if I need to open up drywall.



 
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Old 01-23-23, 09:34 PM
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You would rather not have to mess with what is in the wall.
There are several leak detector washing machine shutoff systems.
This one in the link looks like it will work with what you have in place.
I have installed this model FS3/4 with good results. Price varies... shop around.
Floodstop system

 
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Old 01-23-23, 11:55 PM
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Have you ever tried to get a washer into and out of a 12" deep pan?
How would you ever service the machine if it was sitting in a 12 " deep box?

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Old 01-24-23, 05:18 AM
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Thank you for the response. Pjmax, that looks like a good solution but I am worried about the longevity of it. (Motors look cheap) We have fairly hard water here so that is another curveball. One idea I had was to just install a standard brass valve with a manual shutoff, but of course that wouldnt protect when the machine is running. I do not know when bursts are most typical, guessing during running the machine .
 
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Old 01-24-23, 06:02 AM
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The dangerous part of a hose break is the leak can go undiscovered for hours or days. At least if you are doing laundry the leak will be found relatively soon.

Hard water is a difficulty. A softener may be worth considering if your hardness is bad enough to worry about then you've probably got mineral buildup on other fixtures that would benefit as well. A good defense is to exercise all valves regularly. Not only the washer's valves but also the little shutoff valves underneath sinks and behind toilets.

Unfortunately the best solution is to build a wet room with a floor drain. Short of that everything is a compromise to some extent.
 
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Old 01-24-23, 07:30 AM
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Pilot Dane, that makes good sense. I am willing to give the unit that PjMax suggested a try. I think that combined with a more robust wall valve, and I can swap the hammer arresters over to it. We can manually shut off water (easily) and the little actuators will act as a backup. I like the fact that you can daisy chain sensors together. I will also get braided lines and a pan for the machine itself. We had no issue at all lifting the machine with a couple straps cradled under the bottom. Unfortunately for me a wet room is definitely out of the picture at this point. Thankfully it is just my wife and I and I feel we are diligent about monitoring things and doing maintenance. Thanks
 
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Old 01-24-23, 11:06 AM
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Do you have a sump pump? I assume not, as that would be a good place to drain the washer pan.

I will also get braided lines
Good! That was my first thought when I saw that pic.

You can also look at the Mown Flo. It's a 'Smart Water Monitor' and supposedly will automatically shut off your water if it senses unconventional water use. I haven't used one personally, but I've heard some people who gives them peace of mind.
 
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Old 01-24-23, 09:33 PM
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Those valves in that box already have shutoff handles on them.
 
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Old 01-25-23, 07:11 AM
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Pjmax, yes they have shutoffs. The issue I have with these (Sioux Chief Oxbox) is they are tiny little shutoffs and they are not convenient for regular usage. Also the hot side also doesn't like to shut off completely, you really have to push on it or it will trickle.

I noticed the chrome hex nuts above each valve and was wondering if I could simply unthread this valve setup and swap to a brass valve which shuts off both sides with one lever. Or is it more complicated than that? I believe it is pex in the wall

By the way I decided to go with the Floodstop. You can daisy chain sensors with this system which will give me the ability to place multiple sensors.
 
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Old 01-25-23, 07:40 AM
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Their website has instructions for replacing the valves though they are very generic, it seems one instruction sheet for all their models... so not as helpful as you might want. Basically unscrew the old valve and screw on the new one.

Because of the very tight space I don't think you can use another valve. You probably will have to purchase their valve replacement which will solve the one that's difficult to close but won't give you a single lever for both valves.

Consider replacing the access box in the wall. It would require a couple plumbing connections, sheetrock repair and repainting but then you could choose a valve type that you want.

But, in the end how much money and time are you willing to invest into something that may never be needed. Yes, washer hoses can and do burst but it's a rather rare event. And since your machine is in the basement, even though finished, the damage would be much more limited than in houses that have the machine on the main or second floor.
 
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Old 01-25-23, 08:27 PM
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Thanks Pilot Dane. I agree. I have the Floodstop system on its way. I think you're right. Half the battle
is just being aware of the possibilities. Just recently finished drywall and paint. Hindsight is 20/20. Sioux Chief actually has good customer support and their rep suggested hitting the ball with some lubricant (i have some food grade silicone spray on hand) water off of course, and working the valve. Guess I will try that and put this thing to bed. Thanks to all who responded
 
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Old 01-27-23, 05:59 AM
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If you have a 12 inch deep pan the machine has to be set on blocks to be 9 inches above floor level. Otherwise the interior of the machine will suffer water damage while the water gets high enough to start the sump pump.

The wall faucets for a washing machine should be turned off after you are done using the machine. If the wall faucets are wearing out and getting leaky you can get from a lawn and garden store little gizmos with in line valves and about 4 inches long that screw onto the wall faucets as backup shutoffs.
 
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Old 01-27-23, 06:44 AM
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Just to ask the question!

A washing machine holds 20 gallons for a few minutes per load, your hot water heater is holding 40-50 gallons all the time day and night.

If preventing a water leak was key I think I would focus on what could do the most damage.
 
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Old 01-27-23, 08:36 AM
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Don't forget the flexible hoses under sinks, toilets and dishwashers. Or, the water lines buried in the walls, floors and ceilings who's supply of water isn't limited. A leaking washer is only one of many possible catastrophes.
 
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Old 01-27-23, 04:41 PM
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possible catastrophes.
And which ones are the highest, I would rank washing machine low on the list!

High on my list, flex tubing to ice maker, that is a disaster waiting to happen, mine are copper!
 
 

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