Increasing water pressure


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Old 01-23-24, 02:50 PM
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Increasing water pressure

In my garage, 100 ft from my house, I have plenty of water volume but very low pressure. The house is on a well and I have a 1" pipe running to the garage. What are my options for increasing water pressure in the garage?
 

Last edited by Terry Schwartz; 01-23-24 at 03:35 PM.
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Old 01-23-24, 03:12 PM
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100' of 1" pipe should be fairly decent.
What is the starting pressure at the well ?
What do you need more pressure for ?
If you have a lot of volume but not pressure... try restricting the end like using a nozzle.
 
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Old 01-23-24, 03:38 PM
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Thanks for the fast response. The pressure in the house goes from 30 to 50 psi, maybe in reality a bit lower.
I'd like more pressure for washing cars, etc. A nozzle (at the end of a 50', 3/4" hose) seems to not help much.
The pressure at the sink out there is low enough that I can completely stop it with a finger on the faucet.
Is there a way to use an additional local pressure tank?
 
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Old 01-23-24, 03:57 PM
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If your water use is low.... you could just add an on-demand booster pump.

I used this on my sisters well. I liked it because it had its own gauge and pressure switch.
water pressure booster system

You could also use a basic pump with a switch that you can turn on when needed.
 
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Old 01-23-24, 04:10 PM
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Perhaps I should install a pressure gauge at the sink, see where my pressure is at. That particular pump you linked is a 20 - 40 PSI system, so in theory actually lower than the pressure in the house.

The pump itself looks identical to the one I use to pump water from the lake to run a couple sprinklers, except no tank.

Can a basic pump be added without a tank?
 
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Old 01-23-24, 04:52 PM
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You could change the pressure switch for the well from a 30-50 to a 40-60. I have used a 40 to 60 on my well system (Submersible) and have never had an issue.
 
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Old 01-23-24, 05:15 PM
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In fact I plan on doing that. But had a neighbor do that -- different style well -- and his pump wouldn't shut off, could never get to 60.

What's a bit strange is that I can't really tell any difference between 20 & 50 PSI when showering or doing dishes, etc.... so I haven't been in a hurry to do so.
 
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Old 01-24-24, 04:49 AM
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The flow is being maintained between cycles by the pressure tank (I assume there is one); you'd notice the difference if it was only plumbed direct from pump to house.
 
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Old 01-24-24, 02:34 PM
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Have you considered a plug in pressure washer?
 
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Old 01-29-24, 04:20 PM
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You may want to test the 100 foot line for being clogged or kinked or squashed in the middle.
 
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Old 01-31-24, 08:20 PM
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It's underground. Like I said, tons of volume so I really don't suspect an obstruction (nor would I know how to test for that!). I think it's just length and poor source water pressure.
 
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Old 02-13-24, 01:47 PM
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Here's an update. I ordered a 0 - 100 psi pressure gauge off Amazon. At the laundry tub in the house, I get a reading identical to the reading on the pressure gauge on the pressure tank. Same thing at the pressure tank drain valve.

In the garage, I get about 10 psi lower, and that holds true both at my utility sink (after about 100' of underground 1" pipe) and at the end of another 75' of garden hose attached to that same sink faucet. So for whatever reason, I'm getting about a 10 psi drop between the house and garage. Now it is uphill a bit. I do have 3/4" PEX attaching from the house system (softener output T) to the 1" headed to the garage (and a shutoff valve), and in the garage it reduces down again to 3/4' PEX before going to the water heater, and again to 1/2" PEX before going to the sink. But since I can measure these pressures without any water flowing, I maintain that the static pressure is independent of water flow or volume.

I can measure it one more place, at the drain valve of the garage water heater. That would take the utility sink faucet out of the equation. Not done yet.

You can read above that I have plenty of flow but abysmal pressure for washing cars. The healthy flow tells me there are no significant restrictions in the line. So what the hell is causing the drop in pressure? Length? Altitude? Shut off valves? All of the above? Only altitude makes sense to me. In a closed system the pressure should be the same everywhere.

I still have not bought a 40 - 60 psi pressure switch, that will be next.
 
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Old 02-14-24, 01:08 PM
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Probably not the case, but since there is supposedly a 0.433 psi drop for every foot of elevation, then if the slope up to the garage would be - let's say - 10 degrees - then over 100 feet you would see a 17-foot elevation and therefore between a 7 and 8 psi pressure drop.
But I guess you would certainly notice a 10-degree slope. I'm trying to picture it, but can't. But it sounds like it would seem pretty steep to the eye. But if there are trees or something else there, maybe the slope may be harder to gauge. Just a thought.
 
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Old 02-17-24, 11:48 AM
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Update. I changed the pressure switch to a 40 - 60 PSI unit. Definitely better both in the house and garage. Still not comparable to municipal water service pressure but I'm hoping it'll be better for washing cars. If need be I'll add a booster pump and tank.

Thanks for all your input.
 
 

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