Pressure at zero, but water works


  #1  
Old 02-21-24, 01:28 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 22
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Pressure at zero, but water works

Hello all. I really need some help. 2-3 days ago, I broke down a vertical 1 1/4 PVC pipe. The pipe was capped off on top and had a bit of water in it. The horizontal part of the pipe was going opposite direction from the pump, so I assumed the pipe just had no reason to be there. About 8 hours later, water pressure dropped in well and also looking at pressure gauge I could see that pressure was jumping all over. So I assumed the pipe I broke was indeed connected to the well pump. Trip to home depot and 15 minutes later, I fixed up the pipe and got rid of air from the pump by loosening the bolt on top of iron case thing attached to the pump. It all seemed to work fine.

Two days later, in the morning I heard pump working for 30 minutes. It is not first time it happened where when I look at the gague, it shows already 50 psi, pump keeps pumping, but hour later or so will turn off. This time, 5 hours later, the pump was still working and pressure gauge showed zero. What's weird is even though pressure shows zero, the water still works. Like even after turning pump off, I had still get water with decent pressure. So it seems like pressure readings are wrong. Now, why are they wrong? If some sand went into pipe I broke earlier, could it cause the issue? Or what should I look at?

Please see two videos I have. First one shows the pipe and second shows pump in action.
Pipe

Pump

Thanks so much!
 
  #2  
Old 02-21-24, 02:20 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,100
Received 3,982 Upvotes on 3,574 Posts
Nothing much to see in the second video.

You need a new gauge. The pointer is on the wrong side of the stop pin.

 
Wayne Mitchell voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 02-21-24, 02:38 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 22
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for your reply and great catch, I didn't notice it. I'll definitely replace the gauge, but I am also confused, why then pressure switch does not turn off when it reaches 50 psi? Could there be sand in water that would mess with pressure switch as well as the mechanic switch?

The pipe shown in the video, do you think its somehow related to the pump operation or it's just some random pipe and coincidence that my pump started acting up after I broke it?
 
  #4  
Old 02-21-24, 02:53 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,764
Received 2,182 Upvotes on 1,952 Posts
If you do not have a working pressure gauge how do you know the system has reached 50psi?

If the pump doesn't turn off it may be because it never achieves the cut out (turn off) pressure. This can be from a worn pump or you might have a leak in the system somewhere.
 
  #5  
Old 02-21-24, 05:16 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 22
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thank you! I'll definitely replace pressure gauge tomorrow. Do you think also that it can not reach 50 psi due to the small leak on top of the pump? The 3/4 PVC outlet (or whatever is called) that goes from top of the pump to the house. For some reason anytime I install the PVC on top of the pump, it last a year the most and then starts leaking. And anytime I install it there I always use the plumber white tape (or whatever its called).
 
  #6  
Old 02-21-24, 07:27 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 22
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Update, I changed out the pressure gauge and replaced piping above the pump.

First Video

Second Video

I also installed switch, so pump is still pumping with water blocked off. So do you think its time for a new pump?
 
  #7  
Old 02-24-24, 08:13 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 22
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
For anyone wondering, the issue was pump nozzle (by venturi) was partically clogged with small rocks. I removed rocks and pump went to 50psi with no problem. Day later same issue, but bigger rock. Removed and runs with no problem. I think it all started was because of that random PVC pipe I broke.
 
  #8  
Old 02-24-24, 02:33 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,100
Received 3,982 Upvotes on 3,574 Posts
Good job.
 
  #9  
Old 02-24-24, 03:32 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 2,318
Received 297 Upvotes on 255 Posts
"if It Ain't Broke, Don't Fix It"
My quick guess is that the extra pipe was put in as a buffer to deal with a water hammer issue.

Removing / draining the 'water hammer pipe' probably dislodged some fine grit / rocks, which later clogged the nozzle, and blew grit into the pressure valve, breaking it.

If the replacement anti-water hammer pipe wasn't perfectly airtight, that might explain a pinhole leak letting out air / drips of water which would drop pressure enough to keep the pump from shutting down.

I've had a somewhat similar situation with a prolonged power outage / (or when nobody listens and flushes downstairs toilets / runs water) and the plumbing system is drained dry.
What happens is that any gunk/sludge which WAS stable in the pipes due to buoyancy of being immersed in water, sloughs off / dries out, and drops down to block the pipe.
When water pressure is restored, the dislodged gunk blocks valves, faucette aeration screens, shower heads, toilet needle valves, and clothes & dish washer intake screens.

Only solution is to waste a day going fitting by fitting and opening & cleaning gunk out of each valve in the line and run each segment of the plumbing system for 10 minutes until any dislodged gunk is gone.

Then repeat for every water line in the house.
 
pahanorlando voted this post useful.
  #10  
Old 02-24-24, 05:46 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 22
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for your responses. What's weird with that pipe is I asked person that installs wells and he was confused why the pipe was there and store manager that sells well systems and parts was also confused about the pipe lol Your explanation makes sense. Whats weird is when looking at that vertical pipe, you can see that after 90 fitting it goes further away from the pump, so that made me even more confused.

When I was fixing the pipe, i was out of primer and it was tough to reach there, so I am not 100% sure that I glued the broken pipe very good. I am pretty sure its good, but since the hole is still there I'll probably buy couple more fittings, dig hole deeper to have good access and to make sure sand/rocks won't get inside the pipe, and repipe it properly with primer and pvc cement. I really don't want to dig the hole again should issues repeat lol
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: