Glueing styrofoam

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  #1  
Old 02-13-10, 03:33 PM
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Glueing styrofoam

My 6 year old grandson has a remote controlled helicopter that is made out of styrofoam. He stepped on it and broke the
tail section off. Looking for a glue that I can use to make it stay together. Have not done anything yet, just made sure the pieces still fit together. Thought I would ask here and see what the people would use?
 
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Old 02-13-10, 03:42 PM
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Hot glue is the best option as far as dry time and good bond. It won't eradicate the styrofoam but ya gotta be ready to fit the piecs together kinda quick and hold for a 30 count. But there is such thing as spray styrofoam glue that can be found in the craft stores.
It's good that the piece broke cleanly!
 
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Old 02-14-10, 12:20 PM
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Since it's foam I assume the helia is a coaxial. You really don't need the tail. You can just stick something like a small nail in the fuselage where the tail broke to keep the chopper in balance though it makes it more difficult to quickly spot which end of the heli is forward. You can repair the tail boom by sticking some toothpicks in the foam and put the pieces back together. Some white (Elmers) glue or epoxy will keep it from vibrating apart.
 
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Old 03-08-10, 07:16 AM
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I think Gorrilla Glue would work and not disolve the foam.
 
  #5  
Old 03-10-10, 02:04 PM
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Smile

When we use styrofoam for sets we always rely on PL200 foam-board adhesive. Some may squish out if you use too much. It won't melt the styrofoam and you'll have more "open time" so you can position the foam just right. It will never come apart. Use a sharp blade to remove the excess and paint with water-based paint. It will add a little more weight so be careful to not add too much. Hope this helps.
 
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Old 03-11-10, 04:47 AM
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Who makes PL200 or what is the brand name? I've got a couple projects that would be easier if I were able to glue foam without having to go to a two part epoxy.
 
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Old 03-11-10, 06:15 AM
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I think the company IS called PL. It should be right beside the liquid nail...who also makes a foamboard adhesive I believe. I know HD carries it...
 
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Old 03-11-10, 06:36 AM
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Gorilla glue is also polyurethane (no petroleum to eat up the foam) but it spreads easy.
 
  #9  
Old 03-11-10, 07:07 PM
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Thumbs up

Through trial and error while building large set structures out of t.v. sets, ply and foam (mostly large 'stone' fireplaces and walls) we found that the PL company's PL200 makes a great bond. It even bonds foam to plywood! I've had to dismantle them after a show and let me tell you... It STICKS! But anything that won't melt your foam and makes a good bond will work. Most of the fun in this world is through trial and error. The only down side to the foam-board adhesive I mentioned is it's size. If you open the caulk tube it usually dies within a few weeks. If the Gorilla glue works (I haven't tested it) you might have more options for future use. Anything larger scale you might consider moving up to the PL.
 
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Old 03-12-10, 05:20 AM
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I glued a bunch of xps insulation to the basement concrete wall using PL300. It came in big caulking tubes and was hard to press out. I also used Gorilla glue for adhering one foam piece to another. The construction adhesive tubes might be more appropriate to the larger scale work. I think the Gorilla glue, which also is made out of polyurethane might be better in this case.
As an aside, I was putting on some contact cement to seal the polyethelyne pipe insulation, and was working on a piece of XPS (extruded styrene) foam, and that glue must have contained petroleum product because if definitely ate away the XPS foam. So, whatever you use, maybe test it on an uncritical piece.
 
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