Making a workbench top.

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  #1  
Old 12-08-14, 12:50 PM
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Making a workbench top.

I have a bunch of small pieces of old oak flooring, ranging from about 6 to 18 inches in length.

I'd like to take these, on end, and glue them together to make a nice hard top for a small workbench (maybe 30 inches by 14 inches) for my son--sort of like the way a butcher's block is made. I figured this would not only be super-stong, but would look really nice as well. Something along the lines of http://www.shopwoodworking.com/the-r...rce=igodigital

What is the best way to remove the bevel that is on the bottom of the flooring (as well as the poly that is on the top) so that they can be glued together?

Would a jointer be the tool or a thickness planer? Or some other tool/method?
 

Last edited by rmathome; 12-08-14 at 01:10 PM.
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  #2  
Old 12-08-14, 01:08 PM
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thickness planer is what I would use.
 
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Old 12-09-14, 10:31 AM
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Any other ways to do this? Or am I buying a thickness planer?
 
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Old 12-09-14, 02:27 PM
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I'd use a planer because it's well suited for the job .... and I have one
I suppose you could use a belt sander, the main thing is to get them all flat so when you glue them up there won't be any voids, or at least minimize them.
 
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Old 12-10-14, 07:31 AM
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I cant imagine i would be able to get them all the same thickness with a sander.

What about a jointer?

I am on the verge of getting one and this would be a good excuse. I think the planer would be the right tool. but a jointer would get more use on other jobs.
 
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Old 12-10-14, 09:54 AM
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A jointer will work on the edge but not the face/back of the wood. While I wouldn't mind having a jointer, I've never figured I had enough need to justify the cost. Between my planer and table saw along with a little sanding or hand planing where needed - I've not really missed not having a jointer.
 
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Old 12-10-14, 10:00 AM
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ok, now for the foolish question.

Why wouldnt the jointer work on the back of the board? Wouldnt the blades just remove the tabs on the back (not sure what they are called) and after a couple of passes, have the board smooth--just like a planer would do?
 
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Old 12-10-14, 10:05 AM
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I've never used a jointer so there is a lot I don't know about them but I always thought they were just for edge of the wood, both to make it square and level. With my limited understanding of how jointers are used I don't see where they would work over the entire face/back of a piece of wood. Maybe if they were sawed up into narrow pieces.
 
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