Tacky Primer

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  #1  
Old 01-15-16, 08:10 PM
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Tacky Primer

I have tried a few different ways of getting this initial job done but it comes out the same every time.
On a piece of wood that I got from ACMoore I wanted to make a sign. So I sanded it(not my favorite part) and I have tried both Multipurpose Sealer by American and 1-2-3 Primer from Home Depot's paint department. They both seem to go on tacky and if I should go over a spot it will pick up the paint that was down there. That is why I say it is tacky since it doesn't cover the wood completely but you cant put it on too thick. Can someone tell me what I am doing wrong. There used to be a clear primer out for wood, a long time ago, that I don't ever remember having this problem with. If it's that I am not sanding enough or properly the I am totally "Guilty". Even if I use the Mouse sander I still don't think I can sand properly.
Thanks for any help

Lainie
 
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Old 01-15-16, 09:36 PM
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Just a guess but what grit are you sanding with? Are you cleaning all dust off with a tack cloth? How long are you letting it dry?

Too fine a grit may make the surface too smooth. 100-120 grit would be about the finest you should need for a sign.
 
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Old 01-16-16, 02:28 AM
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I'm not familiar with the American primer is the 123 made by Zinnser?

There are several reasons for a primer not to dry properly; contaminants on the substrate, cold temps or a defect with the primer [rare] Cool temps and high humidity can slow down the drying time.

Is this raw/bare wood or was it previously painted?
 
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Old 01-16-16, 04:57 AM
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Is this primer from a spray can?
 
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Old 01-16-16, 06:02 AM
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When you say "go over a spot", what are you going over it with? You mentioned it "doesn't cover the wood, but you can't put it on too thick", keep in mind primer isn't paint. It's not meant to 'look painted'. Most of the time when priming wood, you will still see the grain, colour of the wood beneath.

Bullseye 123 is a great primer, with a relatively quick dry time for recoat. Full curing takes longer, but you can still paint over it.

If the primer is peeling off, it's either the surface is contaminated with something or it's not getting enough dry time or it's being applied in an environment that isn't appropriate (i.e. temperature/humidity, etc.).
 
  #6  
Old 01-16-16, 02:19 PM
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Thank you very much for answering. I never had anyone to ask whether I was doing it properly or not and apparently not. I am putting it on pretty thick. This was the first time I tried tinting the primer with acrylic so the fact that it is opaque looks alright. But I think my biggest problem with my technique is the sanding. And the dry time. Today it didn't come out too bad by letting it sit overnight.
Thanks for you help. You've been most helppful
 
  #7  
Old 01-16-16, 02:24 PM
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The primes is by Zinnser. I would have recognized the name Bullseye as I did when I just read you post so I am assuming it wasn't there. I think my not realizing how it was suppose to look combined with my not using a heavy enough grit on the sand paper is my problem
thank you
 
  #8  
Old 01-16-16, 02:36 PM
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I think you are right. I am not sanding properly and I put the primer on too thick. I had no idea I was suppose to use heavy sand paper, I would have thought that smoother sand paper would not hurt the wood. But I have heavier sand paper. what grit would you recommend for bare wood from a craft store. I try not to by anything with a knot in it just because I don't like what it looks like. If I was going for rustic I would buy the wood that has the bark still on it. I make a lot of clocks for different people and I never like the way applying the paint turns out. I mentioned before there is no one and never has been anyone to teach me the proper way and I try to buy electric tools to help me do what I want because my wrists are pretty weak. Especially for sanding or cutting. I live in an average sized apartment but I have a workmate to work on when I need something cut. I have a sander, jigsaw (which I have never used yet in the 5 years I had it) a Dermel, a Dremel multi-max and of course power drills.
Thank you very much for taking the time
 
  #9  
Old 01-16-16, 04:08 PM
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Generally 120 grit is fine enough for sanding raw wood. Sometimes it's ok for sanding the primer although a lot depends on the coating that is too be used. Rarely is anything finer than 180 grit needed for painted wood.
 
  #10  
Old 01-19-16, 01:36 PM
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thank you for your heeelp everyone. I sanded a new piece of wood and it came out beautiful. I used med. sand paper then fine. I cleaned it of really good and I left the primer on the wood alone while it dried then I put a secon coat and I can still see the grain. I think I did it right this time. I thank you for your help
 
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