5 Tips for Patching Gazebo Screens 5 Tips for Patching Gazebo Screens

Gazebo screens are great for keeping the bugs out while you are entertaining guests or relaxing on your own. When you find a hole in the screen, you will want to make sure that you patch it quickly before it grows. Here is a quick guide to help you through the process without too many problems.

Tip 1 - Remove Screen

Removing the screen from the actual gazebo is one of the easiest ways to fix the screen and patch it. This way you don't have to worry about leaning on the screen to support yourself and ripping it further.

Tip 2 - Buy an Actual Patch

They sell actual screen patch kits in stores that are made for gazebo screens in particular. It is a great idea to take this route instead of trying to just do it all on your own. Using nail polish in clear around the edges after you patch is a great trick to keep it together and also from hurting people.

Tip 3 - Use Nail Polish

If the hole in your gazebo screen is still pretty small, you may be able to use nail polish as a patch. To do this, hold the gazebo screen flat in one hand and then use the other to paint the clear nail polish over the hole and the surrounding area. Hold it still for 3 to 5 minutes before moving it around or testing to see if it worked. Once the clear nail polish has dried completely, it will act as a makeshift patch. This however does not work if you have a large hole in your screen.

Tip 4 - Use Glue

Glue is also always a great option when it comes to patching up the screen. If the tear is straight, you can just brush on glue and try to keep both of the edges together. Again, using clear nail polish once you have it stuck together can help keep people from cutting themselves and can also give it a clean and mainstreamed look.

Tip 5 - Sew a Patch

If glue and nail polish do not work, sewing a patch on is an option. While this route is less common, it certainly works and can be done by anyone. You will want to find a piece of thread though that matches the screen color as closely as possible. Having the matching thread will help the patch to blend in a little better, making the hole less noticeable to the naked eye. To sew the patch on, thread the needle and make a knot on one end so the thread doesn't pull through while you work. Line the patch up and use pins if need be to keep it in place. Begin on one end and work your way around to finish where you began. Cut the thread and tie it off so it doesn't pull through. Using a small dab of clear nail polish on the end can help to keep the thread from slipping.

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