Hot Topics: Rotting Roof Board

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Original Post: Rotted board that holds up roof

hayley3 - Member

I have a pole barn and somehow water has damaged the truss carrier board. Is there a way to fix that before it crumbles to pieces? It has white mold, so I have sprayed it with clorox cleaner to see if it helps at all, and I've ordered some wood hardener but I'm wondering if I should attach another board to it or if there's something else I don't know about.

Thanks!

Norm201 - Member

That rotted wood is not a structural member. The gutter needs to be removed and the roof metal unscrewed (un-nailed) along with the side panels. At least a two man job if not three.

Don't know where you are located but if you have any Amish in your area, they may be willing do the work at a reasonable cost. Professional roofers may not want to bother with such a small job.

Pilot Dane - Group Moderator

Clorox and "wood hardener" is not a structural repair. Any rotten structural members need to be replaced.

marksr - Forum Topic Moderator

Pics of the damaged board will help us better understand what needs to be done.

hayley3 - Thread Starter

I was wondering about doing a sister board but I want to stop the rotting first.

Also the board to the right is what is holding up the truss.

a rotting board supporting a roof

marksr - Forum Topic Moderator

I'd be wanting to replace that board.

hayley3 - Thread Starter

I can't figure out how to replace it. It is holding up the roof.

Norm201 - Member

I'm assuming that's a tin roof. The member to the right you say is holding the truss. And that is OK? So the rotted board is only holding the edge of the roof material?

If so, then removing that rotted board should not have any adverse affect on the building structure other than letting the tin roof flap in the breeze. Is the truss support member attached to any other pieces?

If not, you'll need to support the member with two pieces of lumber about 45 degrees from the ground to the top. Then remove the rotted piece and replace.

marksr - Forum Topic Moderator

A pic from the outside would help, but it shouldn't be a big deal to unscrew a portion of the roof, replace the board and screw the metal back in place.

Pilot Dane - Group Moderator

I'm thinking you will have to remove the screws from the roof tin that go into that board. Then on the bottom side use a reciprocating saw down the joint between pieces of wood to cut the nails. Then you can slide out the rotten board and slide in a new piece.

hayley3 - Thread Starter

That's a lot more involved than I can do I think. But let me show you the pics.

I wouldn't know how to get that "thing" out of the metal roof. It's not a screw. I see the gutter stakes but not sure what that is in the roof.

And there's a block to the right of the rotted wood, it hangs down and screwed to the truss. Hopefully the next picture will show you better.

Thanks for helping!

a roof board with a ladder against a metal wall

gutter with nail

marksr - Forum Topic Moderator

Looks like they used nails with rubber washers (replaced the old lead head nails) instead of screws on the roof. They can be pulled like any other nail. How long is the gutter? That complicates things.

Norm201 - Member

That rotted wood is not a structural member. The gutter needs to be removed and the roof metal unscrewed (un-nailed) along with the side panels. At least a two man job if not three.

Don't know where you are located but if you have any Amish in your area they may be willing do the work at a reasonable cost. Professional roofer may not want to bother with such a small job.

aka pedro - Member

Yup, as Norm said, not what I would consider structural, but a lot going on with that board because you would have to remove the gutter then unfasten both the roof and side sheathing, as well as the board from the posts.

But it looks like the root cause is wind blown snow or rain, backed up gutters, or simply rain run off curling back on the underside of the roof sheathing setting on that board.

So before taking anything apart, I would want to have a plan as far as what needs to be done at the bottom of the roof sheathing to prevent it from recurring. I'd probably go to my local supply house with those pictures in hand and ask them, but if it's more than you want to do yourself be sure to point this out to any contractors you contact.

Or, as Norm mentioned, I have heard very favorable reports, numerous times, about the work that the Amish do on things like this and would bet they know exactly what to do.

hayley3 - Thread Starter

The gutter is 40 feet long. I don't know how I'm gonna get anyone to fix it. I didn't notice the gutter was clogged. And when I did, I couldn't climb up there by myself. It's a pole barn and pretty tall. I was hoping I could fix it without all that.