How to Dog Proof a Chain Link Fence How to Dog Proof a Chain Link Fence

A dog can dig beneath a chain link fence and cause damage to it. Avoid wasting time and money on repair by doing a little work to make then fence dogproof.

Tools and Materials Pliers

  • Shovel
  • Cement
  • Wire
  • Wire cutters
  • Wooden panels or tarpaulin
  • Tape measure
  • Bucket
  • Water
  • Dowel for mixing

Step 1 – Limit View

Though dogs have a strong sense of smell and are often motivated by attractive odors, they are also very driven by the things that they see. By limiting the dog’s view of the world beyond the chain link fence, you will reduce his temptation to go and investigate, damaging the fence in the process. Try attaching some wooden panels to the fence by looping a piece of wire through it and twisting it to secure them in place. This process can also be undertaken with a length of thick plastic sheeting or a windbreaker.

Step 2 – Increase Height

You may be surprised by how high your dog can jump, but you can use games and agility course exercises to get an idea of his potential. Use this as a guide to work out the height which your existing chain link fence should be increased to reduce the risk of your dog jumping over it.

Step 3 – Posts   

A chain link fence is often at risk of becoming slack if too few posts are used to secure it; in turn, this can make it easier for a dog to find its way beneath it with just a little digging. Prevent this by increasing the number of fence posts to decrease the distance between each one to make the fence more sturdy.

Step 4 – Materials

Avoid using wooden posts to secure your chain link fence to as these can be suffer damage if your dog is prone to scratching and gnawing. In addition, regular cleaning is required if your dog scent marks the fence and this is more easily done with metal posts.

Step 5 – Cement

As a dog will often work persistently to dig its way beneath a fence, you should make an effort to stop this from happening. If you are installing a new fence, dig a deeper trench than is recommended by the manufacturer to make it harder for the dog to dig beneath. This will also make it easier for you to spot and rectify any attempts by the dog to get through. Where the fence is existing and there is no vegetation in the vicinity, dig a trench along the length of the fence. Pour some cement into the bottom of the gap to anchor the base of the fence in place. If your fence isn’t buried in the ground, obtain some brackets from a hardware store to use at the base of the fence to keep it in place.

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