How to Patch Holes in an RV Awning How to Patch Holes in an RV Awning

What You'll Need
Rubbing Alcohol
Tear-Aid Awning Repair Strips
Clear Silicone Caulk or
White Silicone Caulk
Bucket of Warm Water
Cleaning Cloth
Awning Repair Tape (optional)
lthough the small holes you’ve found in your RV awning may appear to be nothing more than an eye sore, they could lead to some serious trouble if not taken care of right away. Every time you extend and retract your awning, you’re taking the chance of causing major damage to that small tear as it could easily get caught and ruin your entire awning. The small expense of patching that small hole could spiral into the cost of replacing the entire awning fabric. Luckily, repairs are done quite simply.
Materials You Will Need
Rubbing Alcohol
Tear-Aid Awning Repair Strips
Clear Silicone Caulk
White Silicone Caulk
Bucket of Warm Water
Cleaning Cloth
Awning Repair Tape (optional)
Step1- Fully Extend Your Awning and Clean
Place the awning in the fully extended position. With the warm water and cleaning cloth, wipe the awning free of debris, dust, pollen, or mildew that may be lurking on your awning. Allow the fabric to fully dry.
Step 2-Check the awning fabric for holes.  Set aside enough tear-aid repair strips to thoroughly patch all of the holes.  If the awning is made of a light-colored fabric, you will need to use the white silicone caulk, whereas if it made a darker fabric you will need to use the clear caulk.
Step 3-Caulk and Cover the Holes
Using your finger put a dollop of caulk on the bottom side of the awning. Lightly smear it and smooth it out with your finger. Repeat this for all holes. Allow the silicone caulk to dry.
Once the caulk is dry, do the same thing to the top side of the awning. Clean the patch strip with rubbing alcohol and allow it to thoroughly dry. Once dry, apply the patch to the sticky silicone caulk on the top side of the awning.  Smooth out any air bubbles. Repeat for all other holes. Allow the patches to dry for at least an hour before retracting your awning.
Awning repair tape is a double sided clear tape that can be used in lieu of the silicone caulk.  If you decide to use tape instead of caulk, only apply it to the top side of the awning.  The tape is easier to apply, however it does not create a sealant on the bottom of the awning as the caulk does.  Applying the tape to the bottom side of the awning is not recommended as it is sticky and will get stuck to the other fabric as the awning is retracted.

Although the small holes you’ve found in your RV awning may appear to be nothing more than an eye sore, they could lead to some serious trouble if not taken care of right away. Every time you extend and retract your awning, you’re taking the chance of causing major damage. That small tear could easily get caught and ruin your entire awning. The small expense of patching that small hole could spiral into the cost of replacing the entire awning fabric. Luckily, repairs are quite simple.

Step1 - Fully Extend Your Awning and Clean

Place the awning in the fully extended position. With the warm water and cleaning cloth, wipe the awning free of debris, dust, pollen, or mildew that may be lurking on your awning. Allow the fabric to fully dry.

Step 2 - Figure Out How Many Repair Strips are Needed

Check the awning fabric for holes.  Set aside enough tear-aid repair strips to thoroughly patch all of the holes.  If the awning is made of a light-colored fabric, you will need to use the white silicone caulk, whereas if it is made a darker fabric you will need to use the clear caulk.

Step 3 - Caulk and Cover the Holes

Using your finger put a dollop of caulk on the bottom side of the awning. Lightly smear and smooth it out with your finger. Repeat this for all holes. Allow the silicone caulk to dry.

Once the caulk is dry, do the same thing to the top side of the awning. Clean the patch strip with rubbing alcohol and allow it to thoroughly dry. Once dry, apply the patch to the sticky silicone caulk on the top side of the awning.  Smooth out any air bubbles. Repeat for all other holes. Allow the patches to dry for at least an hour before retracting your awning.

Awning repair tape is a double sided clear tape that can be used in lieu of the silicone caulk. If you decide to use tape instead of caulk, only apply it to the top side of the awning. The tape is easier to apply. However, it does not create a seal on the bottom of the awning as the caulk does. Applying the tape to the bottom side of the awning is not recommended as it is sticky and will get stuck to the other fabric as the awning is retracted.

 

 

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