How to Repair Common Deep Well Pump Problems How to Repair Common Deep Well Pump Problems

What You'll Need
Wiring
Circuit fuse
Check valve
Deep well pump

Repairing a deep well pump may prove to be a tricky job. This is because such pumps are usually found at a depth of 300 feet below ground level. If the pump fails to transfer water from the well to your house, you must try and repair any problems as soon as possible.

Step 1 - Repair Electrical Problems

The water pump of your deep well may have a problem related to its electrical system. Check it by inspecting the circuit breakers and wires connected to the pump. Reset the electricity by flipping the circuit breakers. If you notice that there is a burned out fuse, remove it and install a new one.

Now, check the pump to see if it is working. If the water is coming, then the broken fuse was the problem. If the water still does not come out of the well, inspect the wires and cables that run out of the fuse box down into the well. The cause of the problem may be a damaged wire. When you are sure that the problem is not related to electric power, check the water pump.

Step 2 - Repair Problems in the Motor

A well.

If the water pump is not working, then the cause of the problem is probably related to the motor. You may also have a faulty starter switch. Replace the starter switch with a new one. Now turn off the power supply and clean the pressure switch using a piece of paper because it could be dirty or obstructed.

Step 3 - Fix Water Delivery

Another common problem the pump of your deep well may have is that it does not deliver water, even if the motor and everything else is working properly. In this case, your deep well pump may have encountered many different problems.

Turn off the power supply and remove the priming plug to check if the pipe contains water. If you do not find any water in the pipe, then the prime may have been lost and you need to prime it once more. The cause of the problem may also be a burnt circuit breaker. In this case, replace the damaged circuit breaker with a new one.

Other problems include the pipe, the foot valve, and the strainer being clogged. If these parts are clogged, the deep well pump may bring up mud or sand instead of water. You may also find that the check valve is broken. In this case, you will need to replace it with a new one.

It may also be a problem related to weather. Cold climates sometimes cause frozen pipes. On the other hand, if the place where you live is very arid, then the water may have dried to a point that the pump cannot reach it.

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