Linear Drainage Explained Linear Drainage Explained

Linear drainage is basically a system that will drain along an entire length as opposed to a certain point; this something that a gully will do. Being able to understand all of the different parts of linear drainage is the best way for you to understand how it works and if it is something that you will need to use at any point in time. Knowing what it is is a great way for you to be able to find uses for it that you are going to be able to do a lot with. 
Range
There is a very large range of linear drainage available. You will find that anything from a half of a meter to a meter long polymer concrete unit is available. The range of sizes goes anywhere from 50 mm deep units for your average roof drainage all the way up to 250 mm deep. This is something that is typically used for motorway drains. There are also a very large range of materials that come along with this type of drainage. Typically, the actual end use of your drain is going to have a lot to do with the best type of the application that you use. 
Grades
There are actually a total of 6 grades that are available. You will need to understand that the actual class rating of your linear drain is not only dependent on your channel but also of the grating meets for the necessary test loads. Make sure that you have a good understanding of each of the grades so that you will know which one you will need for your own linear drainage.
Types
There are 2 different types of linear drainages. There is the type that is built in falls and then there are the kinds that will keep a regular depth that go along their whole length. Because of this, they need to be laid to a fall. The linear drains that have the built in falls will typically be able to drain very large and flat areas. These areas typically are airports, car parks and freight yards. The regular type of linear drainage is something that is used for a shorter length of drain as well as areas that have a natural fall or slope.
Jointing
You will find that all linear drains are sectional. This is something that is going to cause a joint that goes between each of the adjacent units. There are several different types that will each have their own type of overlap joint. This is something that will allow the actual lengths of your drain to have both a female and a male end. These joints will typically seal themselves over time so they can be installed dry. However, if water tightness is a problem, then a sealant may be necessary. If you are working with a very large system then you are going to have to deal with a water tight joint. This is the type of jointing that is done where just a part of the drain is cut where it will fit and the overlap capability is lost. 

Linear drainage is a system that will drain along an entire length as opposed to a certain point; this is something that a gully will do. Being able to understand all of the different parts of linear drainage is the best way for you to understand how it works and if it is something that you will need to use. 

Range

There is a very large range of linear drainage available. You will find that anything from a half of a meter to a meter-long polymer concrete unit is available. The range of sizes goes anywhere from 50 mm deep for your average roof drainage all the way up to 250 mm deep. This is something that is typically used for street drains. There are also a very large range of materials that come along with this type of drainage. Typically, the actual end use of your drain is going to have a lot to do with the best type of the application that you use. 

Grades

There are actually a total of 6 grades that are available. You will need to understand that the actual class rating of your linear drain is not only dependent on your channel but also on the grating parameters for the necessary test loads. Make sure that you have a good understanding of each of the grades so that you will know which one you will need for your own linear drainage.

Types

There are 2 different types of linear drainage. There is the type that utilize built-in falls and then there are those that will keep a regular depth that go along their whole length. Because of this, they need to be laid to a fall. The fall will allow an area for the water to drop or dump into an appropriate source, preventing flooding. The linear drains that have the built-in falls will typically be able to drain very large and flat areas. These areas typically are airports, car parks and freight yards. The regular type of linear drainage is something that is used for a shorter length of drain as well as areas that have a natural fall or slope.

Jointing

You will find that all linear drains are sectional. This is something that is going to cause a joint that goes between each of the adjacent units. There are several different types that will each have their own type of overlap joint. This is something that will allow the actual lengths of your drain to have both a female and a male end. These joints will typically seal themselves over time so they can be installed dry. However, if water tightness is a problem, then a sealant may be necessary. If you are working with a very large system then you are going to have to deal with a water-tight joint. This is the type of jointing that is done where just a part of the drain is cut where it will fit and the overlap capability is lost. 

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