What We're Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench What We're Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench

Several months ago, someone abandoned this motorcycle truck ramp in an alley. I don’t know why they left it - there was nothing wrong that I could see. It stood behind my garage for a long time, trying to convince me to buy a motorcycle, but until that happens I hit on another use for it. I needed a bit of extra organization, and an upcycled, industrial bench would provide the perfect element.

What We’re Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench, Justin DiPego

Cleaning It Up

The alley wasn’t kind to it, and neither was its time in my side yard. I hosed and scrubbed it clean and chased away the spiders. What We’re Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench, Justin DiPego

Rust set in on the tongue, so I ground it smooth. I considered repainting it black, but I liked the rough and weathered look, so I hit it with a clear sealer instead.

What We’re Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench, Justin DiPego

Figuring It Out

There was much debate (in my head) about the best way to fix legs to this thing. I did not want to permanently alter the ramp, so welding was out. The row of holes down the centerline were a perfect attachment point – but attaching what? I considered black iron pipe, but that evolved into threaded rod.

What We’re Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench, Justin DiPego

Making the Base

The holes in the ramp are 1-inch, so I got ¾-inch threaded rod.

What We’re Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench, Justin DiPego

I cut 3 12-inch pieces for the legs and 6 6-inch pieces for the feet.

What We’re Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench, Justin DiPego

They all got attached together with galvanized pipe fittings so the base was an upside-down T. The rod and fittings are not designed to work together, so it takes a bit of fiddling, and with the ¾-inch rod you need ½-inch fittings.

What We’re Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench, Justin DiPego

Standing It Up

I screwed nuts onto the legs 1-inch from the top, slipped a washer on each and set the ramp upside down with the rods extended through the corresponding holes. Then I added another washer and screwed down another nut to hold the bench tight.

What We’re Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench, Justin DiPego

Here I discovered that the whole ramp was torqued, but the legs made for good leverage and I was able to muscle the twist out of it. Finally, I added a nut to the end of each foot to finish it off.

What We’re Working On: My Motorcycle Ramp Bench, Justin DiPego

The height of the bench is adjustable by moving the nuts up or down the rods. Since it’s an organizing bench, not a sitting bench, I left it pretty low. For sitting it would have to be about a foot taller, and I’d go with 1-inch rather than ¾-inch rod. I don’t mind the nuts and washers sticking up, and they go with the industrial feel. If the bench finds itself adapted for sitting, they don’t get in the way unless you are particularly boney.

Of course, all this can be undone when I need to roll a motorcycle up into my truck.

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